The State of Things

Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC) talks with WUNC's Frank Stasio
Andrew Tie / WUNC

U.S. Senator Thom Tillis (R-NC) quickly ascended from a seat on the parks and recreation commission in Cornelius, N.C., to speaker of the North Carolina House in 2011, and finally U.S. Senator.

In his first five months, Tillis has taken a particular interest in the military with seats in the Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Veterans' Affairs.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Tillis about national security, deregulation, immigration and other issues in Washington.

National Security

Image of "Soon," the latest collection of short stories written by Pam Durban, a creative writing professor at UNC.
University of South Carolina Press

The characters of Pam Durban’s short stories face a variety of challenges on different fronts - grief, identity, interpersonal relationships.

But the common thread that binds them all is storytelling. Durban’s latest collection of short stories is Soon (University of South Carolina Press/2015).  

Host Frank Stasio talks with Durban, professor of creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Image of Songs of Water, an orchestral indie band that just released its latest album, "Stars and Dust."
Songs of Water

North Carolina's own Stephen Roach started the band Songs of Water more than 10 years ago as an instrumental experiment. The group's first release was a collection of flowing, cinematic pieces.

Today, Songs of Water is producing lyrical songs with six multi-talented musicians.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Stephen Roach on vocals and dulcimer, Luke Skaggs on vocals and guitar, Greg Willette on vocals and guitar, and Elisa Rose Cox on vocals and strings, and they play live.

Image of Eddie Willis, who is a fourth-generation fisherman. He is the founder of a community supported fishery called Core Sound Seafood.
John Day

The United States controls more ocean than any other country in the world, but more than 85 percent of the seafood Americans eat is imported.

Image of the North Carolina Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Jmturner

The legislature considers controversial measures on gun regulations and magistrates performing same-sex marriages.

And Governor Pat McCrory says he will sign a bill that increases the waiting period for an abortion, a move that contradicts his campaign promise. 

The Be Loud! Sophie Foundation

The Red Clay Ramblers are a decades-old and world-famous string band whose music brings together traditions ranging from old-time mountain music to New Orleans jazz.

The Man Who Stalked Einstein

Jun 4, 2015
Image of the cover for Bruce Hillman's new book, "The Man Who Stalked Einstein."
Bruce Hillman

By 1920, Albert Einstein had become the face of science and theoretical physics. Along the road to fame, Einstein made some powerful enemies including Nobel Prize winner Philipp Lenard.

Lenard was an “old school” scientist who had studied with some of the greatest minds in his era – Bunsen, Helmoltz and Hertz. Lenard found Einstein’s approach to science silly and took every opportunity to discredit him. 

Image of Sepp Blatter, who said Tuesday he will resign as president amid the controversy surrounding FIFA.
The Sport Review/Flickr creative commons

The soccer world is reeling from a corruption scandal at the highest levels.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter said Tuesday he's stepping down. Meanwhile, top soccer executives face $150 million in bribery charges and one of the accused has ties to the Carolina RailHawks.

close-up shot from an exhibit panel
museumofdurhamhistory.org

In recalling history, many cite the leaders who shaped the politics and business of the country, cities and communities. But what about the folks that created small businesses, tilled the farms or raised children?

An exhibit at the Durham History Hub examines the not-so-known names in Durham’s history like Richard Fitzgerald, brickmaker and president of the Mechanics and Farmers Bank.

The Silent Killer

Jun 2, 2015
Photo of The Duke Cancer Center
www.dukemedicine.org

African-American men are nearly two times more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than their white counterparts. And the gap in life-saving treatment is worse; African-American men are nearly three times more likely to die from prostate cancer than white men.

  According to the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, for every 100,000 African-American men in the state, 216 will develop prostate cancer, and 48 will die.

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