The State of Things

The Latest On Paris Climate Change Talks

Dec 10, 2015
Justin Catanoso is covering COP 21 in Paris, where global leaders hope to finalize a universal agreement to fight climate change.
Eric. J. Lyman

Ice caps are melting, ocean levels are rising and coral reefs are dying. The way things are going, some scientists say the world could be unfit for human habitation by the end of century.

All eyes are on Paris right now as world leaders are negotiating an agreement to slow the effects of climate change. A deal is expected by tomorrow, but there are still big issues to resolve between the industrialized and developing nations. 

Immigrants’ rights vigil in Marshall Park, Charlotte, May 1, 2006.
Rosario Machicao / La Noticia, Charlotte

Waves of Mexican immigration to the United States date back to the turn of the 20th century. At the start of the Mexican Revolution, groups of Mexicans moved to the U.S. They quickly became an important part of the blue-collar work force. Though some communities welcomed them, others did not.

Image of United States map in Lower Ninth Ward by John Rosenthal.
John Rosenthal

When photographer John Rosenthal vacationed to New Orleans in 2007, he was stunned by the condition of the Lower Ninth Ward. Contrary to the images that he had seen on television and in newspapers, he found the community to be one not in chaos but at a standstill.

Pile of zines from the Bingham Center’s zine collections
Mark Zupan

We hear constantly that “pens and paper are dead,” and “screens are taking over our lives.” But there is one small corner of the world where pens, paper, scissors and glue are alive and well: the world of zines.

Zines are handmade, self-published magazines that are about almost anything, from politics to music, arts and raw personal experience.

NC A&T

Harold Martin is the first former student of North Carolina A&T State University to lead his alma mater.

During Martin's tenure, the school gained the distinction as one of the top universities for land grant scholarships in the country and third in the UNC system in sponsored research funding.

Picture of the cast from 'Beautiful Star'
Triad Stage

The holiday season brings with it many revered holiday performances like "The Nutcracker" and "A Christmas Carol." These stories are cherished and familiar.

"Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity" retells the well-known Christmas story through a humorous and intimate Appalachian lens. The performance returns to the Triad Stage in celebration of the venue's 15th anniversary. 

Bill Ferris has been a leading documentarian of southern culture for more than five decades. His work has preserved the work of blues musicians, painters, writers and many more.
Marcie Cohen Ferris

When Bill Ferris meets someone, he usually asks, “Where are you from?”

The simple question prompts an important answer for the folklorist. For Ferris, a sense of place is integral to one's identity, and there is hardly a more influential and complex place in shaping identities than the American South. 

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie.
kenrudinpolitics.com

Governor Pat McCrory made his re-election bid official this week as candidate filing began.

And Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump will be in Raleigh tonight to convince North Carolinians to send him to the White House.

Meanwhile, the country's 355th mass shooting this year prompts renewed debate about the political influence of the NRA. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with political junkie Ken Rudin about the latest.

'Day and Night,' 1938, woodcut in black and gray, printed from two blocks, 15 3/8 x 26 5/8 in.
The M.C. Escher Company

Dutch-born printmaker M.C. Escher was a meticulous artist who drew inspiration from landscapes and the natural world. Although he had no formal scientific training, his work features complex mathematical objects and scenarios.

The exhibit “The Worlds of M.C. Escher: Nature, Science, and Imagination” on view at the North Carolina Museum of Art through January is the most comprehensive Escher exhibition ever presented in the U.S.

Duke Medicine Orchestra is comprised of nearly 90 musicians who are all involved in the Duke University Health System in some fashion.
Eric Monson

The Duke Medicine Orchestra (DMO) serves as an intersection of science and art. Since its inception in 2010, the ensemble has grown from 35 members to nearly 90 musicians. The orchestra is comprised of doctors, students and others affiliated with the Duke University Health System.

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