The State of Things

WUNC's The State of Things brings the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you.  The State of Things Podcast presents new stories every weekday with topics from our show.  To subscribe:

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Viva Cackalacky!

Jul 20, 2012

UNC-CH professor David Garcia tried something a little different last year for one of his classes. It was called "Musical Movements: Migration, Exile, and Diaspora," and instead of a lecture, it was hands-on. The students produced a compilation CD of Latin music from around North Carolina.

Orquesta GarDel

Jul 20, 2012

Orquesta GarDel is a lively group with a Latin core but a diverse offering of members. Thirteen artists with experience in Latino music as well as African- and Anglo American jazz make music perfect to dance to.

When James Clark retired as an English professor from North Carolina State University, he wasn't done teaching. He went from the classroom to the retirement home, where he taught the elderly how to share their experiences with family and friends through creative writing.

Charles "Chic" Dambach didn't set out to bring peace to the world. In fact, he went to college to smash heads with fellow football players. But when racism on the team forced him to confront the inequities of the world, his path changed. From volunteering with the Peace Corps to working as chief of staff for a U.S.

Andy Griffith died earlier this month at his home on Roanoke Island, NC at age 86. Griffith was a native son of North Carolina, who proudly brought a tender vision of Southern culture to the masses through television. His portrayal of a wise and honest country lawman on “The Andy Griffith Show” won many hearts.

One night in December 1995, Jill Marker was leaving her job as assistant manager of an artificial flower shop called the Silk Plant Forest in Winston-Salem, NC when she was savagely beaten and left for dead. A few months later, police charged a man named Kalvin Michael Smith with the crime and he was convicted by a jury the next year. Smith has always maintained his innocence and several follow-up investigations show that police may have mishandled the case.

Occasionally, there are headlines about a new company coming to the area and bringing a certain number of jobs with it. Politicians love to talk about job creation, but what does it really mean for a local economy when a handful of people have a shot at employment? How many new jobs would it take to have a truly positive impact on a down economy and does it matter if the jobs are low wage?

Legend has it that Baldemar Velasquez led his first fight for migrant farmworkers’ rights at the age of 12. He started working in the fields at 4 years old and soon became a self-taught scholar of social justice.

The merger of Duke Energy and Progress Energy was supposed to be a powerful marriage of relative equals, but from the moment they combined, the problems started. The board of the new company ousted one of its new leaders, sparking investigations and cries of betrayal. Host Frank Stasio talks to News & Observer reporter John Murawski about the controversy.

There was never any doubt that Yolanda Rabun was cut out for the spotlight. She attended a performing arts high school in Atlanta, GA where she honed her singing and acting skills.  She continued to perform while attending law school where she soon learned that the courtroom is just another kind of theater.

Saluting the Montford Point Marines

Jul 12, 2012

The U.S. Marine Corps remained segregated until 1948. The first group to break the color barrier was a group of African-American men who trained at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC. They became known as the Montford Point Marines. Earlier this summer, the Montford Point Marines were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in Washington, DC. FM Hooper was among the men who were honored at the ceremony.

American Ninja

Jul 12, 2012

Stephen Hayes was a kid when he first read about ninjas in a James Bond novel. When Hayes got older, he devoted himself to martial arts and eventually decided to seek out the origins of the ninja in Japan. There, he learned the martial art of ninjitsu from ninja masters and brought what he learned back to the United States.

IV (intravenous)

Jul 11, 2012

Diana Darby left her life as a television writer in Los Angeles to become a musician in Nashville. Now she is on her fourth album, titled "IV (intravenous).” It was written after a series of misfortunate incidents caused her to take a break from writing and recording. Darby joins host Frank Stasio to play live and speak about her first CD in six years.

Chapel Hill writer Terry Roberts goes back to his Appalachian roots with his new novel, "A Short Time to Stay Here" (High Country Publishers/2012). The book is a work of historical fiction that transports readers to the summer of 1917 with a character named Stephen, the proprietor of a luxury resort,

Waste Not

Jul 10, 2012

Tate Rogers never expected to enter the world of waste management, but when presented with the challenge of finding a way to safely extract human waste from latrines in third-world countries, this environmental engineering student found himself struck with a brilliant idea. The idea was so simple, Rogers figured it had already been invented. It hadn't. He received a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop his waste removal technology.

North Carolina native Robert Lee Vann was a pioneer of journalism during his lifetime. He served as editor of "The Pittsburgh Courier" which was the largest black newspaper in circulation until Vann’s death in 1940. He was recently commemorated in his hometown of Ahoskie, NC with a long-earned historical marker. Marvin Jones of the Chowan Discovery Group and Cash Michaels, editor of The Carolinian, join host Frank Stasio to talk about both Vann's legacy and the legacy of the black press.

Businessman Kevin Trapani will tell you that his company, Redwoods Group, does well by doing good.  Redwoods Group recently won an award that validates his claim. B-Lab, an organization that certifies socially responsible companies known as B-corps, named it one of the “Best Companies for the World.”

Hal Kwalwasser's examination of successful American school districts continues today with a look at Watauga County in western North Carolina. Kwalwasser documented the dedication of Watauga's teachers and how they work with families to make sure that students thrive in school in his book, “Renewal: Remaking America's Schools for the 21st Century” (R & L Education/2012). He joins host Frank Stasio again for the second part of our conversation on education reform.

Hal Kwalwasser was an anti-trust lawyer before becoming counsel to the Los Angeles Unified School District. He applied his legal skills to America's educational policy to break down the problems and find the solutions recorded in his new book, “Renewal: Remaking America's Schools for the 21st Century” (R & L Education/2012).

Xiu Xiu Always

Jul 5, 2012

The experimental pop band Xiu Xiu has been a fixture on the indie music scene for the past ten years. While they are not famous in the conventional sense, they have a strong cult following. Xiu Xiu has toured the world over and produced eight critically acclaimed albums, including their newest "Always.”

Poet Peter Cole is known for his translations of Hebrew literature and medieval Hebrew poetry, but in his latest translation, "Poetry of Kabbalah: Mystical Verse from the Jewish Tradition" (Yale University Press/2012),  he explores the spiritual side of Jewish faith.

What did Chapel Hill look like during the Civil Rights Movement? Photographer Jim Wallace captured images for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s student newspaper, the Daily Tar Heel. But Wallace didn’t see fire hoses or police dogs turned on protesters.

Legendary actor and North Carolina native son Andy Griffith has died. Griffith passed away in his home in Dare County this morning at the age of 86.  He was famous for playing iconic TV roles like Ben Matlock and Sheriff Andy Taylor on “The Andy Griffith Show.” WUNC reporter Dave DeWitt and host Frank Stasio look back on Griffith’s life and storied career.

NC at the World Saxophone Congress

Jun 29, 2012

Wayne Leechford is a classical baritone saxophonist. Most people haven't heard of classical saxophone, and it is difficult to find classical music specifically written for that instrument. Therefore, Wayne personally commissioned composers to write music for his new album, “Works of Art.”

What becomes of the artifacts a literary lion leaves behind? When writer Reynolds Price died last year, his brother and niece sorted his property which included real estate holdings, an art collection and extensive correspondences with Eudora Welty, William Styron, W. H. Auden and Toni Morrison among other luminaries. Bill and Memsy Price join host Frank Stasio to discuss Reynolds Price's estate and his posthumously published unfinished memoir, "Midstream" (Scribner/2012)

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