The State of Things

Sallie Krawcheck has gone from Wall Street executive to leading Ellevate, a women's professional network.
A.E. Fletcher Photography

Sallie Krawcheck was once one of the most senior executives on Wall Street with top positions at Smith Barney and Merrill Lynch.

She held her own in a male-dominated industry, but after two public firings from those positions, Krawcheck took a different career path. 

  She became an entrepreneur and purchased a women’s professional network, rebranding it as Ellevate. It is a way to connect professional women with each other.

The married couple, Pete and Andrea Connolly, comprise Birds and Arrows.
Bill Hudson

Before Birds and Arrows moves out of North Carolina in December, the rock duo will release “Edge of Everything,” its fifth album in the state and seventh overall.

Andrea and Pete Connolly are headed west to Tucson, Arizona, a city both fell in love with while on tour last year. Andrea plays guitar, while Pete plays cajon.

Jumilla / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Department of Justice is scheduled to release about 6,000 inmates at the end of October as part of a larger effort to reduce overcrowding in prisons and scale back punishment for low-level drug offenses.

North Carolina is set to release approximately 218 inmates, the fifth most in the country.

Survivors of a civilization-ending apocalypse manage to salvage fragments of their cultural history.
Emily Levinstone

The Simpsons is the kind of show that people watch over and over. Many episodes continue to linger in popular culture no matter how many years have passed since they originally aired.

But what would happen if suddenly all The Simpsons episodes and all other media and technology were gone and all that remained were people’s memories of what they think they heard or saw?

Army recruits arriving at Fort Benning for basic training
Raymond McCrea Jones

What makes someone want to become a soldier? What does it look like to transition from a civilian to a soldier? How does it affect individuality?

Raymond McCrea Jones, who used to be on staff at the New York Times, wanted to answer those questions. He embedded himself in a company of 162 Army recruits at Fort Benning in Georgia for 10 weeks. His fly-on-the-wall photos show the experience of basic training, from 4 a.m. wakeup calls to grueling field exercises.

The Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department could implement no-go zones to prevent criminals from returning to the same areas.
James Willamor / Flickr Creative Commons

The Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department is considering a policy that would preclude people who are arrested from returning to designated areas.

The measure is designed to reduce crime and other cities have instituted similar measures with carried successes. Opponents say the no-go zones raise constitutional concerns.

Right Image Photography, Inc.

Mental healthcare practices in the United States have changed quite a bit in the past two centuries. State hospitals and asylums once housed the great majority of mentally ill individuals, but definitions for what constituted mental illness were often vague and included conditions like epilepsy and PMS. In the 1950s and 60s, government officials pushed towards the deinstitutionalization of mental health care, and many individuals experiencing mental illness were released into the community.

Michael Keenan Gutierrez
Rebecca Ames

Neal Stephens is a photographer who returned to his hometown in Colorado after World War I to find another war raging in the little coal town: a conflict between union miners and Neal's uncle, Seamus, who runs the mine.


In the course of the labor fight, the local sheriff is found dead, and Neal stumbles across a larger conspiracy that could end his family's mining company and land him in prison for murder.


UNC Board of Governors
Dave DeWitt

The UNC Board of Governors is deeply divided over how to elect a new leader.

Some board members have called for the resignation of chair John Fennebresque after he called an emergency closed-door meeting to interview a candidate.

Emails reveal several board members accused Fennebresque of botching the hiring process which started after President Tom Ross was forced to resign earlier this year. 

The division represents a split within the Republican members of the board.

Rennie Harris Puremovement takes hip-hop dance from the street and puts it on stage.
Brian Mengini

From "krumping" in Los Angeles to "breaking" in the streets of New York City, hip-hop dance takes many shapes and styles.

Hip-hop choreographer Rennie Harris takes street dance and puts it on the stage. Harris founded Rennie Harris Puremovement in 1992, the oldest and longest running hip-hop dance touring company in the country. He tours with the company showing audiences the eclectic variations and styles of hip-hop dance.