The State of Things

Michael Traister / Six String Drag

North Carolina musician Kenny Roby teamed up with his friend and bass player Rob Keller in the early 1990s to create a roots band called Six String Drag.

The alternative country-soul-rock music thrust Kenny, Rob and the rest of the band into their own careers, but now they are back together, and they have created their first album in 18 years, called Roots Rock 'N' Roll.

They returned to their eclectic style with a few images of the 1950s and 1960s thrown in, including a song called "I Miss the Drive-in."

multiple choice test
Alberto G. / flickr

    

College athletics programs are under a lot of pressure to make money for their schools. That means, among other things, keeping players academically eligible.

The scandal at UNC-Chapel Hill is one example. An investigator there found that over the course of 18 years, nearly 3,000 students took classes that did not require them to show up. About half were student athletes, and the report pointed the blame at a few administrators.

The Biltmore Company

Biltmore House is bringing Downton Abbey to Asheville with a new exhibit featuring more than 40 original costumes from the show.“Dressing Downton: Changing Fashion for Changing Times” traces the evolution of fashion and social norms during the early 20th century and draws a number of parallels between

Sarita and her family arrived from Nepal in 2008, where they had lived in a refugee camp for many years after fleeing political instability in Bhutan.
Andrea Patiño Contreras

The economy can have a major influence on the history of a city.

Factories once brought folks from the world over to new places with a similar goals in mind - to prosper and make a better life. That is the story of Lynn, Massachusetts. Once the home of General Electric and the countless shoe factories, the city was home to immigrants from Canada, Ireland, Greece, Italy and Armenia. Now, Lynn bears only the vestiges of its industrial success and is economically depressed. Immigration continues but from new areas of the world.

Laura Wagner/ The Radio Haiti Archive

Radio Haiti was the first independent Haitian radio station and the first public media platform to broadcast largely in Creole. Under the leadership of journalists Jean Dominique and Michele Montas, the station spent decades covering the social, cultural and political stories often ignored by most other Haitian media. Radio Haiti was shut down by the government a number of times and was under constant government pressure while it was on the air.

Photo by Barcelona-based photographer Violeta de Lama, courtesy of Wil Weldon.

More and more people around the world are choosing to get their hands dirty—digging in the dirt in their backyard or at a community garden to plant produce.

24 Hour Payday Loan Outlet
Vinceesq / http://www.24hourpaydayloan1.com/

  

Troubled by consumer complaints and loopholes in state laws, the federal government is crafting new rules to protect borrowers of payday loans.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is considering placing caps on the number of times a borrower can take a payday loan and requiring lenders to do credit checks. They also want to encourage states or lenders to lower interest rates on loans.

Breathing Back

Feb 24, 2015
Breathing Back: A Meditation Chorus is now on display at The Carrack.
Alexis Pauline Gumbs / http://thecarrack.org/exhibit/breathingback/

  The final words uttered by Eric Garner, "I can't breathe," have become a mantra for protesters across the nation speaking out against police brutality.

Two Durham-based artists have repurposed the phrase for a new cause: to help outraged and exhausted communities connect to a legacy of activism and build resources for their long-term spiritual, emotional and physical resilience. They call it “Black Feminist Breathing.”

Mary-Dell Chilton is a pioneer in the field of agricultural biotechnology. As a young scientist at Washington University, she led the team of researchers that produced the first genetically-modified plant. Chilton moved to North Carolina in the early 1980s to begin her corporate career and has continued to conduct research that shapes the agricultural production of corn, cotton, and other crops.

Malcolm X waiting for a press conference to begin on March 26, 1964.
U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress / Wikimedia Commons

The messages of civil rights leader Malcolm X still resonate 50 years after his assassination.

Conversations about Islam in America, police shootings and freedom of the press are as relevant in 2015 as they were on the day of his death: February 21, 1965.

Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill start a two-day conference to examine the legacy of Malcolm X today.

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