The State of Things

Coal fired power plant in Wyoming
Greg Goebel / Flickr Creative Commons

Earlier this week the Obama Administration announced its EPA Clean Power Plan that directs states to lower greenhouse gas emissions from coal-burning power plants by around 32 percent by 2030.

Long Upon The Land

Aug 6, 2015
Image of Long Upon The Land cover
Grand Central Publishing

Margaret Maron has written mystery novels for more than two decades.

Her longest series is about a North Carolina district court judge named Deborah Knott. Maron’s latest title, “Long Upon The Land” (Grand Central Publishing/2015) is the 20th and final novel in the series.

Host Frank Stasio talks to Maron about the book and her writing career.

Bill Maher

Aug 6, 2015
Image of Bill Maher
David Becker / WireImage

Comedian Bill Maher has been setting the standard for political talk shows for more than two decades.

  It all started in 1993 with his first talk show “Politically Incorrect.” As the host, Maher specialized in biting political humor. His latest Emmy-nominated program is “Real Time with Bill Maher.”

He wrote four bestselling books, starred in one of the highest grossing documentaries of all time, and still tours regularly on the stand-up circuit.

A Polished Soul

Aug 5, 2015
Image of Michael Rae Anderson
Michael Rae Anderson

Michael Rae Anderson grew up in poverty and in an abusive household. As an adolescent, he saw his peers with new cars and plenty of money earned by selling drugs.

Anderson began selling drugs and guns as a teen. A fight over drugs ended with a shooting and Anderson was charged with first-degree murder. He took a plea and served 17 years on a life sentence.

'Hashtags are the new protest signs'
Mark Dixon / https://www.flickr.com/photos/9602574@N02/15770344667

There are all kinds of conversations happening in the multiverse that is social media.

From discussions about Ta-Nehisi Coates’ new book to police brutality, social media takes a look at a wide array of issues in the headlines.

Gavel
www.stockmonkeys.com / Flickr Creative Commons

The trial of a former Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer in the shooting of 24-year-old Jonathan Ferrell is underway this week.

Wes Randall Kerrick is charged with fatally wounding Ferrell, who had been involved in a car accident and knocked on a door for help. The resident of the home told officers she believed Ferrell was a burglar. Kerrick shot Ferrell 12 times.

Image of miner loading coal in Portal 31 in Lynch, Ky. in the 1920s.
Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College and the Appalachian Archives. These photos are part of the U.S. Coal & Coke and International Harvester Image Collection.

Tens of thousands of African-Americans called Appalachia home in the early 20th century, yet most popular representations of the region rarely include details about the black experience.

One young researcher sought to change that through an archival project that examines the history and culture of coal mining communities in eastern Kentucky. Karida Brown grew up in New York, but both of her parents are from Lynch, Ky.

Image of George A. Payne in 1975
David Payne

Critics have called David Payne the most gifted American novelist of his generation. He is best-known for fictional works like “Confessions of A Taoist On Wall Street.”

But in the past decade he has inched farther and farther away from fiction writing and started to take the advice that he gives to his own creative writing students: “write about the hardest material.”

Meet Robert Brown

Aug 3, 2015
Image of Robert Brown (second from right) meeting with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his assistant Bernard Lee and Rev. L.V. Booth.
Robert Brown

Robert Brown is one of the most influential North Carolinians you’ve never heard of.

He had a pretty humble start in High Point, where he was born and raised. He was among the city’s first African-American police officers in the 1950s.

But he moved on quickly, first as a federal drug enforcement officer, and then as an adviser to some of the world’s most powerful people: Martin Luther King Jr., Richard Nixon, Nelson Mandela and John F. Kennedy, and that’s only part of the list.

Stethoscope
jasleen_kaur / Flickr Creative Commons

Scientists have set their sights on finding a cure for AIDS. At the opening of the International AIDS Society conference in Vancouver, AIDS researchers made a call to action for a worldwide shift in HIV treatment.

They now suggest that doctors provide medication immediately after a diagnosis instead of first waiting for the signs of illness to appear.

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