The State of Things

Ari Berman's book 'Give Us The Ballot' looks at voting in America since the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Farrar, Straus and Giroux

The modern voting rights movement starts and ends with the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

The landmark piece of legislation was meant to give African-American voters open access to the polls.

Today, the law is still at the center of the debate about whether states can restrict that access.

Several states, including North Carolina, have passed new elections laws since the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, leading to both federal and state court challenges.

A portrait of Deondra Rose when she was four
Deondra Rose

Deondra Rose has always been 10 steps ahead of her peers.

She took an interest in government and politics in first grade while running for student council and says that many of her most vivid memories about growing up revolve around electoral politics—like when she lost her first election in 4th grade because she refused to vote for herself.

Image of the North Carolina Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Jmturner

The state Senate has passed a proposed constitutional amendment to limit income taxes and year-by-year spending increases.

Racial Ambiguity In Asian American Culture

Aug 14, 2015
Book cover of Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture by Jennifer Ho
Jennifer Ho

People often refer to Tiger Woods as a black golfer but never an Asian golfer, despite his mother's Thai heritage. Woods’ identity made professor Jennifer Ho think about the complicated ways society labels multiracial people.

And it also got her thinking about her own experience identifying as a Chinese Jamaican American.

Josh Moore's Parted Ways

Aug 14, 2015
Josh Moore
Josh Moore

Josh Moore's musical career began in a Christian rock band in Kernersville when he was just 16. After five years, he jumped to a New York alt-punk band called Classic Case, and that led him back to Carrboro, North Carolina. 

Josh has been there for the last decade, composing music and playing in the local scene. But Josh’s friends noticed an increase in his drinking was affecting his music and relationships.

Blue Cross Blue Shield pen
frankieleon / Flickr Creative Commons

The Affordable Care Act was designed to give more access to healthcare at lower costs. But the state’s largest health insurer, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina, has requested a rate increase of more than 34% for patients enrolled in the ACA plans.

The company says it needs the additional revenue to offset increasing costs. The request, along with increase requests from other insurers, will be considered by the North Carolina Insurance commissioner.

The live orchestra that accompanied the premiere of Blair Tindall's 'Mozart In The Jungle.' Many of them were onscreen for the series as well.
Blair Tindall

Oboist and Chapel Hill native Blair Tindall has played with some of the biggest names in classical music. She has performed on stage at Carnegie Hall and played in the orchestra pit for Broadway musicals like Les Miserables andMiss Saigon.

Excavations at Site X in 2014 helped yield possible proof that a group of Roanoke colonists moved inland.
First Colony Foundation

The fate of the "Lost Colony" on Roanoke Island remains one of the biggest questions in North Carolina history.

Some believe the colony moved to Hatteras Island and others believe they assimilated into local native tribes.

Grady and Marie Jefferys
Andrew Tie

The marriage between Grady and Marie Jefferys began under uncertain circumstances.

Marie had just left a violent ex-husband, Grady had withdrawn from college, and neither of their parents approved of their relationship.

  It was a marriage that defied the social norms of North Carolina in the 1950s, when Grady started his career as a prominent Raleigh journalist and communications consultant.

Why I Am A Salafi

Aug 12, 2015
Cover of Michael Muhammad Knight's book 'Why I Am A Salafi'
Michael Muhammad Knight

Michael Muhammad Knight grew up in an Irish-Catholic-working-class family in upstate New York. And as a teenager, he found himself at a unique crossroads: he wanted to either continue writing letters to Charles Manson or devote his time to studying Islam.

He chose the latter, and that decision changed the course of his life. A year later, Knight had converted to Islam and spent two months studying the religion in Pakistan.

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