State Board of Elections

Two ads on NC's Controversial Voting Law
North Carolina Board of Elections, Democracy North Carolina

The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP complained this week that state officials are misleading voters with their educational campaign about the state’s controversial election law. The measure will require voting officials to ask voters for photo identification.

The NAACP argues the ads should inform voters that they can cast ballots "with or without a photo ID. The board of election’s posters and flyers say, “Most voters will need to show acceptable photo ID.”

A sign stating "Vote Here".
flickr.com/photos/zen

The State Board of Elections is investigating voter registration forms mailed to North Carolina residents by the political action group Americans for Prosperity

voting sign
Flickr creative commons

Last year the General Assembly passed new rules for North Carolina voters.  They include shortening the time for early voting and eliminating the ability to register when casting an early ballot. 

Veronica DeGraffenreid works for the State Board of Elections.  She says the deadline to register is at the end of the week.

voting pins and buttons
YardsaleDan on Flickr

State elections officials say they're investigating 765 cases of voters who could have gone to the polls in two states, including North Carolina. The numbers come from a national crosscheck of voters that compares records in 28 states. State lawmakers mandated participation in the program last year. Kim Strach is the executive director of the state Board of Elections.

Host Frank Stasio and guests on the State of Things follow the trail of money.
RambergMediaImages / Flickr/Creative Commons

The previous State Elections Board's term expired just as they were beginning to investigate $235,000 of allegedly illegal political donations.  The donations implicate Gov. Pat McCrory and legislators from both parties.  Governor McCrory made the unusual decision of replacing all of the board members. 

Last Friday, Gov. Pat McCrory appointed an entirely new staff to the North Carolina State Board of Elections. Earlier that week the board was set to begin an investigation into contributions to McCrory's campaign. A one-hundred percent turnover is unusual and leaves many speculating whether or not it has to do with this investigation.

John Frank is a political reporter for the News and Observer and joined Host Frank Stasio today to talk about the turnover.

The state Board of Elections is investigating voter registration work done by a firm hired by the Republican party. The national G-O-P fired Strategic Allied Consulting after irregularities were found in some Florida registration forms. The state Republican party has also terminated its relationship with the firm. The company says on its website that problems were traced to one person. Gary Bartlett is executive director of the state Board of Elections. He says the Board is checking several advocacy groups who register voters.

A citizens group has gotten some names cleared off Wake County voting rolls because they belong to people who have died.

Gurnal Scott: The Voter Integrity Project of North Carolina brought a list of 386 names before the Wake County Board of Elections. It said state health records showed those people have died. Elections staff confirmed it. Jay Delancy of the Voter Integrity Project says they succeeded because they were persistent.

Runoff Elections Set

May 18, 2012

The races are set for primary runoff elections in two months.

Gurnal Scott: Several Council of State races, congressional contests and state legislative elections will take place in this 2nd primary set for July 17. Gary Bartlett of the State Board of Elections says he hasn't seen more than an eight-percent turnout for a runoff during his tenure. Bartlett adds the low turnout saves the state some money when it re-opens the polls