SOT At The Movies

Oscars
Prayitno / Flickr

 

The Oscar nominations were announced earlier today with Birdman and The Grand Budapest Hotel topping the list with nine nominations each.  As the stars prepare to hit the red carpet, listeners take a look back at the best and worst films of 2014.

From Boyhood to Interstellar, Host Frank Stasio talks with North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes and North Carolina State University film professor Marsha Gordon.

The original poster for Dirty Dancing, which was filmed in North Carolina.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dirty-dancing.jpg

From The Last of the Mohicans to Dirty Dancing and Days of Thunder, movies made in North Carolina have gone on to great box office success. 

The Big Combo (1955)
Wikipedia

  

Smoke-filled rooms, femmes fatales and twisting crime plots are markers of a period in cinematography known as film noir.

Meet Me In St. Louis
Wikipedia

Since the transition from silent films in the 1920s, the musical has been a staple of the movie industry. Some of the cinema’s biggest hits include song and dance.  From Singing in the Rain to Grease, host Frank Stasio looks at musicals at the movies with North Carolina University film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes.

I Feel Pretty from West Side Story
Wikipedia

  Singing in the Rain. West Side Story. Grease. These wildly popular musicals became big hits on the silver screen as well. 

Later this month, North Carolina State film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes will talk with host Frank Stasio about musicals in the cinema on The State of Things. 

Image of Superman
Flickr/Nicholas Rumas

When you were a child, did you imagine being Superman? 

Wikimedia

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show from Tuesday, March 18, 2014.

For many, The Wizard of Oz is a happy tale of Dorothy and her little dog Toto skipping along the yellow brick road.

But for some, the Wicked Witch and the flying monkeys were the visions of nightmares.

Yankee Doodle Dandy
Via Flickr Cliff1066

  

Tomorrow, across the nation, Americans will celebrate our independence with parades, barbeques and fireworks. Some will celebrate the holiday with an annual viewing of their favorite patriotic film.

Groundhog Day
Wikipedia

  You know that movie. The one you can almost recite word for word. The one you had on VHS but you wore out the copy. The one that comes on the television and you are glued to the screen.

What is it that draws viewers to these films? Why would someone watch something they have seen so many times before? Is there a sentimentality embodied in watching the same film over and over? Does it change as we age?