Shrimp

An image of a shrimp on a fork
Ramiroja / Wikipedia Creative Commons

A federal court has sentenced a Harnett County seafood processor for mislabeling  imported farm-raised shrimp. Alphin Brothers Incorporated faces a $100,000 fine and three years probation for falsely marketing 25,000 pounds of shrimp as wild-caught in the U.S.

Image of Eddie Willis, who is a fourth-generation fisherman. He is the founder of a community supported fishery called Core Sound Seafood.
John Day

The United States controls more ocean than any other country in the world, but more than 85 percent of the seafood Americans eat is imported.

A picture of a shrimp trawler.
NOAA Fishwatch / Wikipedia

A Duke University study says North Carolina coastal fishermen could make more money and preserve the shrimp fishery, if they'd wait until late in the season for the big catch.

Duke Environmental Economics Professor Martin Smith is a lead author of the study. He analyzed State Marine Fisheries data showing fishing vessel size, the size of the catch, and what it sold for on a daily basis over six years.

shrimp, North Carolina coast
Leoneda inge

A governmental panel has ruled that the U.S. shrimp industry isn't being injured by foreign imports. The news is a blow to North Carolina's shrimp industry.

Earlier today, the U.S. International Trade Commission voted four to two that the domestic shrimp industry has not been harmed by imports from China, Ecuador, India, Malaysia and Vietnam.

Asian Tiger Shrimp
James Morris/NOAA

Scientists are keeping a close eye on North Carolina's shrimp population as fishermen see more of an invasive species known as tiger shrimp. Fishermen have reported catching more than 200 this season. That's up from an average of 10 to 20 since 2008. James Morris is an ecologist with NOAA's Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research in Beaufort. He says more tiger shrimp could mean a smaller catch for North Carolina's traditional shrimpers.

This year's harsh winter has led to a steep decline in North Carolina's shrimp catch. That's according to state wildlife officials, who say cold waters killed the majority of white shrimp in North Carolina water. That species usually spends the winter near the shore and swims out to sea around the beginning of June. Carlyle Gilgo is a seafood dealer in the town of Sealevel near Morehead City. He says he hasn't caught any shrimp yet this year.

NC Shrimp Catch Down This Spring

Apr 22, 2011
White Shrimp
NOAA

  Consumers might notice that there are fewer local shrimp in the market than in other years... that's because fishermen are noticing there are fewer local shrimp in coastal waters.  Shrimpers blame the weather. Bill Rice is a seafood dealer in Carteret County and heads a fishermen's co-op there. He says the absence of white shrimp is probably due to waters that are staying cool this spring.