Secretary Aldona Wos

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Employees at the state Department of Health and Human Services received subpoenas in a federal investigation, according to a report by the News and Observer. 

Federal prosecutors are investigating expensive contracts for high-ranking DHHS employees and a Medicaid consulting firm. The subpoenas request information for more than 30 employees, including the employment contract for former DHHS Secretary Aldona Wos. 

Rick Brajer
Dave DeWitt

Governor Pat McCrory announced Wednesday Aldona Wos is resigning from her position as the secretary of the state's Department of Health and Human Services.

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An effort to open the state’s Medicaid program to managed care ran into trouble today. A report that passed a subcommittee easily last week was gutted in a health and human services oversight committee meeting this morning.

The move may indicate a victory for the administration and some Republicans who want to build on an existing program for Medicaid patients. 

This morning, Health and Human Services Secretary Aldona Wos left no doubt where she stands on the issue of Medicaid reform. She addressed a conference room filled with state lawmakers, reporters, and lobbyists.

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State health officials would like to update North Carolina's antiquated system of recording deaths.  The Tar Heel state uses handwritten or typed documents to declare a death.  Those forms are hand-delivered through several stops from the funeral home to state records in Raleigh -- which can take at least three months. Secretary of Health and Human Services Aldona Wos told lawmakers today her department wants to move to a fully electronic system:

String-like Ebola virus particles are shedding from an infected cell in this electron micrograph.
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State health officials say a patient at Duke University Hospital who so far has tested negative for the Ebola virus has posed no risk to the general public.

Secretary of Health and Human Services Aldona Wos and others held a call-in news conference Monday afternoon to talk about the patient, who arrived in the U.S. from Liberia on Saturday.

The patient, who remains anonymous, is currently in an isolation ward at Duke, after reporting a fever while traveling by bus to North Carolina from New Jersey.

Aldona Vos, DHHS
North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services


North Carolina’s Medicaid program covers 1.7 million people at a cost of $14 billion per year.

The program for low-income and disabled residents has had a turbulent past. Last year, computer glitches created a long backlog of applications and payments for providers. And Medicaid has been a question mark in the budget, causing cost overruns for several years.

But health officials say the system is improving enough that the state could reconsider expanding Medicaid to half a million people who do not have health insurance.

A picture of colorized Ebola particles.
Thomas W. Geisbert, Boston University School of Medicine / Wikipedia

North Carolina health and safety officials are building a united front to prepare against the Ebola virus.

State Health and Human Services secretary Aldona Wos announced at a press conference yesterday that the Centers for Disease Control has named North Carolina's State Laboratory of Public Health to be a regional hub to test potential Ebola specimens.

A child builds a lego tower in a doctor's waiting room.
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Governor Pat McCrory’s administration has presented a new plan to the public to overhaul the state’s Medicaid system.

This plan would coordinate services through what are called accountable care organizations, rather than big managed care companies. State health officials had previously leaned toward a managed care model.

Secretary of Health and Human Services Aldona Wos says the accountable care model is what hospitals and health providers want.

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NC Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services’ failure to notify lawmakers about a Medicaid waiver earlier this year could cost the state at least ten million dollars.

Back in August, North Carolina’s former Medicaid director, Carol Steckel, formally requested a three-month waiver from the federal government to postpone the new process for renewing coverage for Medicaid patients.

Secretary Aldona Wos
Jessica Jones

State health officials say they have cleared an enormous backlog of food stamp applications that could have caused North Carolina to lose 80 million dollars’ worth of federal funding. The head of the Department of Health and Human Services, Secretary Aldona Wos spoke before lawmakers in a committee meeting earlier today.

"We, the state of North Carolina, believe that we have successfully achieved our first milestone with the USDA in reference to delay in the recertification of our applications," said Wos.