The Regulator Bookshop

Riverhead Books/2017

Patricia Lockwood grew up in a Catholic family in the Midwest. But her family’s circumstances were a little different: Lockwood’s father was a priest. Throughout her upbringing, Lockwood navigated her father’s larger-than-life personality and the institutional bindings of the Catholic church.

An image of the book cover for 'The Last Road Home'
Kensington Books

Growing up as a kid in the 1950s, Danny Johnson liked to do two things: read books and work on his grandmother's farm. He's now combined his love for Southern literature with imagery from his upbringing in his debut novel, "The Last Road Home" (Kensington Books/2016). 

Host Frank Stasio talks with Johnson about his Southern adolescence and creating a story outside of his lived experience.

book cover of "Fight Club 2"
Chuck Palahniuk

The first rule about Fight Club is "you do not talk about Fight Club." But author Chuck Palahniuk is making an exception.

As a sequel to the 1996 novel, Palahniuk is continuing  the story with a new graphic novel "Fight Club 2" (Dark Horse Comics/2016). It's set ten years after the original story, and shows the main character Sebastian refueling his alter ego Tyler Durden and the group Project Mayhem.

photo of Steve Michell, Tom Campbell, Sarah Goddin, Linda-Marie Barrett and Erica Eisdorfer
Courtesy of Deonna Kelli Sayed/Jon Mayes/Lance Richardson

Summer is the time of year when vacationers look for good books to take to the beach or their backyard hammocks.

These books can be the ones that are light, frivolous and enjoyable, or simply the ones that you never had the chance to finish before.

An image of Crystal Sanders
Crystal Sanders

In 1965, a Head Start program called the Child Development Group of Mississippi offered an alternative education for children in low-income communities. It also gave working-class black Mississippians a chance to secure jobs outside of the local white power structure.

An image of author Willie Drye
Doward Jones

Florida is the third largest state in the U.S. and gets millions of tourists each year. But back in the early 1900s, the state was mostly undeveloped swampland and had quite a different reputation.

During the Roaring ‘20s, the Sunshine State experienced a huge land boom due to the work of entrepreneurs, movie stars and scoundrels, and began to attract wealthy entrepreneurs and eager vacationers. 

An image of 'The Road Taken' by Henry Petroski
Bloomsbury Press

Approximately 65,000 bridges in the U.S. are considered "structurally deficient," according to the latest report from the American Society of Civil Engineers. With roads in constant need of repair and bridges collapsing, America's infrastructure is at a crossroads, says author Henry Petroski.

Stock photo of a book
Horia Varlan / Flickr Creative Commons

When producer Sonja Williams began researching for the radio series, Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was, she found very little African-American radio drama from the 1940s. What little she found reinforced negative stereotypes.

A colleague eventually suggested she look into Destination Freedom, a series of weekly broadcasts created by journalist and activist Richard Durham that featured African-American leaders and heroes of the day.

Image of George A. Payne in 1975
David Payne

Critics have called David Payne the most gifted American novelist of his generation. He is best-known for fictional works like “Confessions of A Taoist On Wall Street.”

But in the past decade he has inched farther and farther away from fiction writing and started to take the advice that he gives to his own creative writing students: “write about the hardest material.”

Author and activist Eileen Flanagan
She Writes Press

At 49, author and environmental activist Eileen Flanagan hardly recognized herself.

Her large home, her stocks in a hydraulic fracturing company and her family's multitude of unnecessary gadgets all seemed at odds with the way she lived three decades ago as a young Peace Corps volunteer in Botswana.