Redistricting

NCGA

If history is any indicator, turnout for the North Carolina primary on May 8th may be low, especially with no glitzy federal or statewide candidates on the ballot—fewer than 8 percent of voters cast a ballot in 2016. But this year may be different. The races highlight one of the biggest political stories of 2017: our state’s election maps.

 

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a class size bill, and North Carolina’s redistricting saga are among the issues in the news this week in state politics. Also, how open is North Carolina state’s  government and how accessible is it for journalists and the public to access what happens at the General Assembly?

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Thanks to winter weather, it was a slow work week for many in North Carolina. However, the political world trudged along with more redistricting and judicial developments.

The Supreme Court has struck down two congressional districts in North Carolina because race played too large a role in their creation.
Rose Trinh / Flickr, Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday delayed a lower-court order that would have forced North Carolina Republican lawmakers to redraw the state's congressional districts by next week because of excessive partisan bias in current lines.

The Supreme Court has struck down two congressional districts in North Carolina because race played too large a role in their creation.
Rose Trinh / Flickr, Creative Commons

North Carolina Republican legislative leaders asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday to block enforcement of an order throwing out the state's congressional map because the lines were too partisan and directing a redraw almost immediately.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

Federal judges ruled yesterday that the state's congressional districts drawn by Republican lawmakers are too partisan. They described them as  drawn to “entrench Republican domination of the state’s congressional delegation.” This ruling marks the first time a federal court has struck down a congressional map on those grounds. 

Federal judges have ruled that North Carolina's congressional district map drawn by legislative Republicans is illegally gerrymandered because of excessive partisanship that gave the GOP a rock-solid advantage for most seats and must quickly be redone.

Thomas Farr, with right hand raised, is sworn in during a Senate Judiciary Committee.
Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Thomas Farr is a Raleigh-based lawyer who has counseled North Carolina Republicans on a multitude of racially divisive cases.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in North Carolina politics, a conversation about judicial redistricting and Anita Earls’ race for state Supreme Court; the special master's legislative maps; and objections from North Carolina Senators Tillis and Burr against Donald Trump’s EPA nominee.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

The Republican-led General Assembly has given final approval to new political boundaries in largely party-line votes.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

North Carolina House and Senate members are sticking with tradition by declining to interfere with the other chamber's proposed district boundaries.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

Updated 3:15 p.m., August 20, 2017

The North Carolina House has approved a redrawing of dozens of district boundaries in response to federal court rulings throwing out nearly 20 districts approved in 2011 as unlawfully relying too heavily on race.

Governor Roy Cooper
Logan Ulrich / WUNC

North Carolina's highest court for the first time is wading into the long-running effort by Republican legislators to strip away as many powers as possible from Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.

Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina lawmakers released new voting maps last weekend. The freshly-drawn district lines come after 28 House and Senate districts were found by the U.S. Supreme Court to be illegally gerrymandered along racial lines. 

Public hearings in 7 locations statewide on new maps to replace illegal racial gerrymanders from 2011
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Scores of North Carolina residents turned out Tuesday evening to address members of the state House and Senate redistricting committees.

North Carolina House lawmakers released a map on Saturday, August 19, 2017 of new proposed legislative districts.
Courtesy of NCLeg.net

Mapmakers are proposing new districts for most members of the North Carolina House, a move forced after federal judges ruled state Republicans illegally gave too much emphasis to race in the current version of legislative voting lines.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation with Jeremy Loeb, Morning Edition Host and reporter at Blue Ridge Public Radio.

Jeremy joins Jeff on this politics podcast to discuss redistricting, the powerful U.S. House members from Western North Carolina, craft beer, and what he misses most about WUNC - where he used to work.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers have approved a set of guidelines from which they will draw new political maps.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers have started the process of implementing new political boundaries for the 2018 election, after federal judges invalidated 28 legislative districts for illegally gerrymandering black voters.

People listen in as the joint redistricting committee meets in Raleigh on August 4, 2017.
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Democrats in the State Senate are pushing for what they call fair redistricting. The legislature meets this month to redraw district maps.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, a plan to repeal Obamacare fizzled in the U.S. Senate. What impact, if any, will that have on North Carolina's congressional delegation?

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

General Assembly members tasked with soon drawing North Carolina's legislative districts after courts found some boundaries were drawn with unlawful racial bias will hold their first meeting next week.

Litigation, legal, gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr Creative Commons

Lawmakers have tabled a plan at the General Assembly to redraw judicial boundaries. The policy about-face followed a day of contentious debate and halts a measure that had initially appeared fast-tracked at the legislature, possibly destined for legal challenges.

Picture of gavel
Flickr.com

A committee in the state house will consider a bill to revamp judicial districts. Critics say the plan is aimed at giving the North Carolina judiciary a Republican bent.

N.C. Supreme Court Building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

The U.S. Supreme Court has told North Carolina's top court to reconsider a redistricting lawsuit filed by Democrats and allies after the nation's highest court struck down congressional districts as racial gerrymanders.

North Carolina's newest Congressional districts are among those up for debate in Wake County Superior Court Monday and Tuesday.
NC Legislature / ncleg.net

The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that the North Carolina General Assembly violated the constitution by relying too heavily on race in drawing two congressional districts. The decision upholds a lower-court ruling that struck down maps drawn in 2011 by a Republican-led legislature.

The Supreme Court has struck down two congressional districts in North Carolina because race played too large a role in their creation.
Rose Trinh / Flickr, Creative Commons

Updated 4:31 p.m., May 22, 2017

The Supreme Court struck down two congressional districts in North Carolina Monday because race played too large a role in their creation.

the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Updated at 11 a.m., May 22, 2017

State lawmakers were handed their latest legal defeat Monday, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down two of the state's congressional districts because race played too large a role in their creation. Since 2011, more than a dozen Republican-backed bills have been struck down in federal and state courts.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, a conversation with Jessica Huseman, senior reporting fellow at ProPublica.

Jordan Green / Triad City Beat

UPDATE: According to reports from News & Record reporter Danielle Battaglia, a superior court judge has ordered the release of the police body camera footage of Jose Charles to the Greensboro City Council for viewing in a closed session.

Another violent arrest by police in Greensboro is testing North Carolina's 2016 law on the release of police body camera footage. The mother of fifteen-year-old Jose Charles says police choked her son without provocation at a Fourth of July party, and she wants the public to see the police tape of the incident. Police charged Jose Charles with attacking an officer, among other crimes. 

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