Raleigh Planning Commission

A picture of City Market in the Moore Square Historic District.
jmturner / Wikipedia

Raleigh's Historic Development Commission is hosting a public meeting tonight about the city's historic preservation rules. Experts and the public will weigh in on the city's design guidelines for appropriate building projects in historic districts.

Martha Lauer is a city planner and also directs the Raleigh Historic Development Commission.

“The city would like to see changes in its local historic districts managed so that the character in each district is protected,” she said.

Wake County
www.wakegov.com

Wake County is celebrating a major milestone this week. Latest numbers show the county will welcome its one millionth resident.

So, bring out the pulled pork and the craft beer!  If calculations from the Census Bureau and the Carolina Population Center are correct, Wake County will have one million residents by Friday.

Phil Matthews is Chairman of the Wake County Board of Commissioners.

A picture of a car wrapped in Fox News and American Idol ads.
Nicolelajones / Wikipedia

The Raleigh Planning Commission wants to close a loophole in the city's sign ordinance. This morning, they'll present a proposal to the City Council that would force businesses to move vehicles emblazoned with company information away from the street.

The measure would require the vehicle to be parked behind the building or near the entrance to the business.

A picture of the Rockford restaurant's sign.
Shop Local Raleigh

The Raleigh City Council has created a task force to review the city's sign ordinance. The measure determines what signs certain businesses can have, what they look like, and where they put them.

Raleigh recently overhauled its planning code, but didn't change the sign ordinance much. Local businesses and associations have complained that the rules are too restrictive. This week, Raleigh appointed 11 business people and residents to study the issue.

Planning and zoning administrator Travis Crane says he's looking forwards to what the task force finds.

A picture of Mitchell Silver.
City of Raleigh

Raleigh is bidding farewell to its planning director.

Mitchell Silver took the post in 2005, when Raleigh was a mid-sized city grappling with rapid population growth. Silver says the city was able to ride the wave by becoming an attractive place to live and work.  He cites changing density and zoning ordinances, building the Raleigh Convention Center, and revitalizing Hillsborough Street and Cameron Village as successes.

The city of Raleigh hosts the Wide Open Bluegrass Festival this weekend.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tsolson/ / flickr

  

Thousands of bluegrass fans will pour into downtown Raleigh this week for the Wide Open Bluegrass Festival. 

City of Raleigh

Raleigh city officials have plans for several new residential developments in the middle of the capital city.  They say it's part of their master plan to entice not only new residents but new business downtown.

It is also an indication that Raleigh is doing well economically.  City Planning Director Mitchell Silver says residences that are on the drawing board or under construction are geared toward not just urban professionals, but families.