Rainfall

A picture of the Fishing Pier at Ocean Isle Beach, NC.
Pubdog / Wikipedia

Forecasters say the worst is over, at least for the Triangle. The cold front, which blew damaging winds and heavy rain is headed toward the ocean.

On Tuesday, a tornado damaged homes and trees near Stedman. Some areas between Fayetteville and Wilson saw more than four inches of rain.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Brandon Dunstan said things will quiet down later today.

Raindrops falling on water
Juni from Kyoto, Japan / Wikipedia Creative Commons

The weather warmed up over the weekend, after snow, ice, and freezing temperatures deadlocked much of the state last week.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Phil Badgett said air flow from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic is keeping things warmer and rainy in the region today.

Heavy rain could be reducing farm yields across the state, like this one in western NC.
mystuart via Flickr, creative commons

Record rainfalls across much of North Carolina have resulted in poor crop growth. When there's too much moisture, root systems often don't get a chance to develop fully, and certain nutrients, like nitrogen, also tend to be depleted.

Carl Crozier, soil science professor and extension specialist at N.C. State, says it's a complex issue because of all the different types of soil in North Carolina.

Flooding in Chapel Hill on Sunday
Jstn568 / wunderground

Orange County continues to recover from weekend flooding, and officials are trying to secure relief funding for those displaced.

At a news conference today, Chapel Hill officials said close to 130 residences are unlivable due to water damage from weekend rain. It's unclear when, or if, people who lived in those units can go back home.

Rain and thunderstorms are predicted for most of North Carolina.
screengrab, ABC News radar

Scattered storms are once again in the forecast for this afternoon. The pattern of late-day thundershowers each day is not so unusual, according to meteorologist Darrin Figursky from the National Weather Service in Raleigh. He says what has been a bit atypical is the amount of widespread rainfall we've gotten as a result of these storms.

"Now a lot of that was probably due to the remnants of Andrea at the beginning of the month, where on one day we got four to five inches," Figursky says.  "So for the month with that in mind, we're running three to four inches above normal for the month. We're only maybe an inch or an inch or an inch and a quarter of being in the top five wettest Junes of all time."

A satellite image of Thursday's storm as it advanced on North Carolina.
National Weather Service, Raleigh / Facebook.com

Power was still out Friday morning for hundreds of thousands of people in North Carolina after severe storms. 

A fast-moving system swept across the state Thursday, knocking down trees and power lines.  Duke Energy Progress says nearly 60,000 people were without power Friday morning in Wake County.  Meteorologist Phil Badgett says damage reports came in quickly Thursday night.