Race

The State of Things
12:40 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

Documentary Shows Struggle For Racial Equality In Brazil

RAÇA, a documentary film
Credit racafilme.com / Raca

Brazil is often touted as a racial democracy or a multicultural paradise. More than half of the country's population is of African descent, and there are more than 130 words to describe skin tone. But according to Afro-Brazilian filmmaker Joel Zito Araújo, there is much work to be done in the struggle for racial equality. The scholar-in-residence at UNC's Sonja Haynes Stone Center highlights the challenges in his new film, RAÇA. Host Frank Stasio talks with Araújo and the Center’s director, Joseph Jordan.

Read more
The State of Things
12:05 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

How Black Authors Write About U.S. Law And Race

Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing, Literature by Karla Hollway
Credit dukeupress.edu / Duke University Press

Host Frank Stasio talks with scholar Karla Holloway about her newest book, 'Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing Literature'

From enslavement to the one-drop rule to the three-fifths compromise, United States law has defined African-American identity. Duke University professor Karla Holloway is exploring how black fiction connect racial identity and the creation of law for African Americans. 

Read more
MLK
8:29 am
Mon January 20, 2014

The Triangle Prays, Serves And Teaches In Dr. King’s Memory

Credit UNC Librairies

The Reverend Martin Luther King Junior is remembered today for his dedication to racial equality and social justice. Many groups across North Carolina are gathering to march, pray, and volunteer in their communities.

Students and faculty from Duke and NC Central Universities and Durham Technical Community College will gather to assemble dry food packages for Stop Hunger Now. That organization provides food aid to disaster victims around the world.

Read more
Arts & Culture
2:40 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Three Of The Greensboro Four: In Their Own Words

This is the actual Woolworth lunch counter where the protest took place. It is now housed at the Smithsonian.
Credit Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Background to this first person audio story from reporter Jessica Jones:

Back in 2010, I was thrilled to cover the opening of Greensboro's International Civil Rights Center and Museum, housed in the old Woolworth's store where the famous sit-in took place that led to the end of desegregation.

It was exciting for me personally because the assignment allowed me to meet and interview three of the surviving members of the Greensboro Four, the men who as college students showed such incredible courage in integrating the lunch counter.

Read more
The State of Things
12:47 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

The Editor And The Dragon: A North Carolina Journalist Takes On The Ku Klux Klan

The Editor and the Dragon
Credit south.unc.edu / Southern Oral History Program

A new film debuts on UNC-TV tonight, Thursday January 9th. "The Editor and The Dragon: Horace Carter Fights The Klan" tells the inside story of a man of courage, the journalist Horace Carter.

Filmmakers describe the story this way:

Read more
Arts & Culture
11:57 am
Wed January 8, 2014

Why Did It Take 7 Years For SNL To Hire A Black, Female Cast Member?

Sasheer Zamata, newest cast member of SNL
Credit NBC

  

The recent decision by Saturday Night Live to hire an African American woman underscores the lack of diversity on the show and in the wider media landscape.

In fact, Sasheer Zamata will be only the fourth African American woman to ever be a cast member on the show. She will be the first since Maya Rudolph left in 2007. Zamata makes her debut January 18.

Why do minorities still get short shrift in the entertainment industry?

Read more
The State of Things
10:24 am
Thu December 19, 2013

How Did #NotYourAsianSidekick Become The Place To Talk About Race and Stereotypes Online?

Suey Park, creator #NotYourAsianSidekick
Credit Suey Park

Lots of people are talking about race on Twitter this week, using the hashtag #NotYourAsianSidekick.

The person who started the conversation is the writer Suey Park. She says that there are so many stereotypes: Asians are submissive, good at math and science, and play the violin. She wants to have a fuller conversation about Asian Americans.

This minute and a half BBC video is a good intro to Suey and the topic:

Read more
The State of Things
11:39 am
Thu December 12, 2013

A Lifelong Friendship Of Civil Rights Activist And Ku Klux Klan Member

Derrick Ivey (Left) as C.P. Ellis and Lakeisha Coffery (Right) as Ann Atwater
Credit manbitesdogtheater.org / Manbites Dog Theater

    

  In 1971, civil rights activist, Ann Atwater, and ku klux klan grand exalted cyclops, C.P. Ellis chaired a community meeting to handle violence in the recently desegregated Durham school system. And those meetings started a unexpected lifelong friendship between the two. A play by Mark St. Germain retells the story of this unlikely friendship in the play, Best of Enemies

Read more
Education
6:09 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

'Black And Blue Tour' Focuses On African American History At UNC

Unsung Founders Memorial, UNC-Chapel Hill
Credit Don McCullough / Flickr.com

Tim McMillan is a senior lecturer at the University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill's Department of African, African American and Diaspora Studies.  He is also the creator of The Black and Blue Tour.  In 2001 Tim was teaching a seminar called “Defining Blackness” when he realized how much of UNC’s  own racial history went overlooked.  He started the Black and Blue tour of the UNC campus to help people gain a more nuanced perspective. He knows these conversations can make people uncomfortable.

Read more
Politics & Government
2:15 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Report Details Plight Of NC's Segregated Neighborhoods

A new report from the UNC Center for Civil Rights examines the plight of the state's "excluded communities."
Credit UNC Center for Civil Rights

A new report from the UNC Center for Civil Rights highlights the issues faced by some segregated communities in North Carolina.

The report refers to these neighborhoods as “excluded communities.”

“What we’re talking about are communities that are somehow not fully included in the political, social, civic, and economic life of the state of North Carolina,” says Peter Gilbert, the author of the report

Read more

Pages