Race Identity

Image of Chang and Eng Bunker
Wikimedia Commons

Note: This is a rebroadcast from last year.  

Conjoined twins Chang and Eng Bunker toured the world in the mid 1800s, putting their bodies on exhibit for a wide array of audiences. They eventually settled in rural North Carolina, became slave owners, and fathered 21 children, but they were never able to escape the public eye. 

An image of hands raised
Creative Commons

  From Ferguson to Baltimore, events have unfolded across the country with race at center stage.

American media coverage has reported on protests and investigated lethal altercations between black males and police officers.

Image of Chang and Eng Bunker
Wikimedia Commons

  

Conjoined twins Chang and Eng Bunker toured the world in the mid 1800s, putting their bodies on exhibit for a wide array of audiences.

A new memoir by UNC's Kenan Visiting Writer Daisy Hernández
A Cup of Water Under My Bed Book Cover

This was originally broadcasted on 10/21/2014

Daisy Hernández grew up between cultures as a first-generation American child of a working-class Colombian mother and Cuban father. 

Her family hoped that she’d “become white,” but she struggled to meet their demands while forming an identity of her own. Her new memoir, A Cup of Water Under My Bed (Beacon Press/2014), traces her journey, weaving stories of religion and family with details about a new world away from home, where she developed a new political consciousness, came out as bisexual, and worked as a feminist journalist.