Race

Crime
7:43 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Listen: Man Describes Impact Of Mass Shooting On Surviving Family Members

Episode art for Criminal by Julienne Alexander

On April 13, 2014, former KKK member Frazier Glenn Cross pulled into a Jewish Community Center and ambushed a grandfather and grandson, killing both. He then killed another woman a short distance away.

What does the family left behind do when they are thrust into a national spotlight? How do they figure out what to disclose and what should be private?

Will Corporon knows - he lost his father and nephew to the violence that day. Listen to his story:

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The State of Things
12:05 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Mapping Inequality: How Redlining Is Still Affecting Inner Cities

The original Home Owners' Loan Corporation map of Durham, dated July 23, 1937. Red areas were largely African-American communities, and considered to be too risky for new home loans.
National Archives

After the stock market crash of 1929, Americans across the country were in danger of losing their houses to foreclosure. 

The federal government stepped in, providing bonds for homeowners to refinance their mortgages as part of the New Deal. But in larger cities, the government drew boundaries between neighborhoods that were eligible and ineligible for new loans. 

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Law
5:47 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

[Listen] Newly Discovered Images Document KKK Rally In Chapel Hill, 1987

KKK Rally in Chapel Hill, NC June 15, 1987
Michael Galinsky

The pictures capture a day that many in Chapel Hill, NC would like to forget. White-hooded figures marching carefree down Franklin Street. It was the day the KKK came to town: June 15, 1987.

About 60 people took part in the march and membership rally. The event started in Durham and then progressed to Chapel Hill. Two thousand people lined the parade route; some to support the participants, others to heckle them. 

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History
3:40 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Richmond, Va., Wrangling Over Future Of Historic Slave Trade Site

Ana Edwards, the chief opponent of the Shockoe Bottom stadium proposal, talks about historical markers at the Lumkin Jail historical site in Richmond, Va.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:34 am

On a warm spring night, more than 150 people gathered in Shockoe Bottom, a name taken from the Native American word for a site in Richmond, Va. This part of town, bounded by I-95 and bisected by railroad lines, was central to a city that prospered from the slave trade.

"The best guesstimate is several hundred thousand people were sold out of Shockoe Bottom," says Phil Wilayto, a leader of the grassroots movement to establish a memorial park here. "Probably the majority of African-Americans today could trace some ancestry to this small piece of land."

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The Two-Way
4:24 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Reactions To NBA's Ban Of Clippers Owner Donald Sterling

Former and current NBA players (from left) Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Roger Mason, along with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson and the Lakers' Steve Nash and former Laker and Clipper Norm Nixon, welcome the NBA's ban of Clippers owner Donald Sterling Tuesday.
Noel Vasquez Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 11:24 pm

Current and former NBA players praised the league's decision to punish LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling with a lifetime ban over racist remarks he made in an audio recording. Commissioner Adam Silver announced the punishment Tuesday, days after the audio emerged.

In addition to the lifetime ban, the NBA also fined Sterling $2.5 million.

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Code Switch
4:16 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

How Donald Sterling Violated The NBA's Unspoken Social Contract

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling attends the NBA playoff game between the Clippers and the Golden State Warriors on April 21.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

We play for each other, for our fans, and for our families — not Donald Sterling.

That was the general message that players for the Los Angeles Clippers reiterated, off-mic, when the Sterling fiasco blew up over the weekend. They were being buffeted by questions about how, exactly, they might respond to allegations that Sterling, the team owner, had been recorded saying that he did not want black people to attend his team's games. Would they boycott? Would they be focused enough to be able to play?

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The State of Things
11:46 am
Tue April 8, 2014

My White Friends

MG, Chicago, Illinois, 2009.
Myra Greene

Photographer Myra Greene describes her new exhibit 'My White Friends'

Photographer Myra Greene spent years taking self portraits exploring her own black identity. But after sharing these photographs with a friend, she realized that not everyone thinks about race as much as she does. 

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Education
7:37 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Chuck Stone, UNC Professor And Pioneering Journalist, Dies

Former UNC Journalism Professor Chuck Stone died Sunday. He was 89.
Credit University of North Carolina

A much-admired former journalism professor at UNC-Chapel Hill died Sunday. 

Charles Sumner "Chuck" Stone, Jr. taught at the university from 1991 until he retired in 2005.

Stone was one of the founding members of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and he was the first African American columnist at the Philadelphia Daily News.

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Arts & Culture
8:54 am
Fri April 4, 2014

VIDEO: Discovered LIFE Magazine Photos Reveal Curious NC Tradition

This is the first time that these images, of the 1952 Wilson NC Shoeshine Contest, have been made public.
John G. Zimmerman John G. Zimmerman Archive

A yearly shoeshine competition in the 1950's in Wilson, NC drew more than 1,000 spectators and the attention of LIFE Magazine. The images, though, were never published. They were not seen publicly for more than 60 years. Until now.

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Race and Politics
3:44 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

On Racism: 'This Is Our Heritage. You Can't Get Away From It'

Ta-Nehisi Coates is writer and Senior Editor at The Atlantic
Credit The Lavin Agency

Last month, Michael Dunn was convicted of attempted murder, after firing several rounds into an SUV of young black men. Jordan Davis, a 17-year-old, was killed in the incident. Dunn is 47, and he is white. Dunn invoked the "Stand Your Ground Law" to defend his actions, and the jury was deadlocked on whether to charge him for Davis's murder. He'll face a retrial this summer.

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