Police

Law
9:51 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Fayetteville Police Chief: Collaboration Is Key To Stop Human Trafficking

Credit Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr

Police in Fayetteville say they will work with other local authorities to crack down on human trafficking in North Carolina. 

The Cumberland County District Attorney joined Fayetteville's mayor and police chief this week to renew their efforts to fight traffickers. 

The state's largest cities have reported several cases in recent months that involved kidnappings and forcing victims into prostitution. 

Fayetteville police chief Harold Medlock says the crime is not new in North Carolina, but authorities need to collaborate more to catch offenders.

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The State of Things
11:54 am
Fri August 15, 2014

The Power of Stories In Events Like Ferguson

A book exploring the intersection of stories and politics.

Professor and author Frederick W. Mayer talks about his new book 'Narrative Politics'

  

Stories shape how we think about ourselves and the world around us, and insights from science, history, and biology confirm that humans are storytelling animals. 

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Politics & Government
7:01 am
Mon July 21, 2014

NC General Assembly Stories We’re Following: Week Of Monday, July 21

The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Credit Jorge Valencia

The state House and Senate are entering their fifth week of negotiations over the state’s $21 billion budget. The Senate is scheduled on Monday night to take on at least one other major piece of legislation and two bills intended to beef up policing in North Carolina.

Medicaid Overhaul

The point of this legislative session is for the General Assembly to make adjustments to the state’s budget. But talks are moving so slowly, that Senate leaders last week said they might as well take up an overhaul of the Medicaid system.

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Military
7:31 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Fayetteville Police Ready To Silence Sirens For Veterans In Crisis

The Silent Siren program seeks to make a registry of veterans with PTSD and traumatic brain injury, so police know to respond to emergencies at their homes without blaring sirens or flashing lights.
Credit Alejandro Mejía Greene/JubiloHaku / Flickr

Police and community leaders in Fayetteville are working on a local incarnation of the Silent Siren program to help veterans in an emergency.

Fayetteville police responded last week to a call from a woman whose husband, a soldier, was parked outside a Walmart threatening to kill himself. Police approached the stand off without lights, sirens and shouting.  They were able get the soldier help.

Fayetteville wants to expand that gentle approach for emergencies involving veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or traumatic brain injury.

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Education
10:57 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Wake County Schools Accused Of ‘Racist,’ ‘Unfair’ Policing Practices in Complaint

The state's NAACP along with other civil rights groups held a press conference Thursday afternoon outside East Wake High School.
Credit Reema Khrais

A group of parents, students and civil rights organizations filed a federal lawsuit against the Wake County School system and local police departments, alleging that the school system’s policing practices “violate the constitutional rights of students.”

The complaint claims that the police officers who work in Wake County schools unlawfully punish students and criminalize exceedingly minor misbehaviors such as “throwing water balloons, stealing paper from a recycling bin and play-fighting with a friend.” 

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The State Of Things
5:17 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

Mentally Ill Or Criminal? Making Tough Calls In The Field

Credit Nashville.gov

In the early morning hours of November 19, Durham  youth Jesus Huerta left home. His family called 911, reported him as a troubled runaway and noted his drug problem. A Durham police officer located Huerta, frisked him, cuffed him, and put him in the back of a cruiser. Moments later, the 17 year-old was dead from a gunshot to the head. His family questions the circumstances surrounding his death.

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The State of Things
12:08 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

Did Durham Police Follow Protocol When Arresting 17-Year-Old Jesus Huerta?

Friends and relatives posted pictures like these of Jesus Huerta around Durham, NC after he died
Credit Leoneda Inge

  

Jesus Huerta died from a gunshot wound while in police custody last November. Did officers know he was at risk of killing himself? The teen's family says yes.

Durham authorities have said the officer on the scene, Samuel Duncan, had not been told the 17-year-old threatened to kill himself and used drugs before the officer picked him up the morning of Nov. 19.

But the attorney representing Huerta’s family questions that and points to this radio communication in which officers talk about Huerta having a history of drug abuse:

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The State of Things
11:53 am
Wed December 4, 2013

Durham Youth Death Sparks Protests

Credit City of Durham

    

Seventeen year-old Jesus Huerta died of a gunshot wound in the back of a Durham police car last month. His death sparked protests outside of Durham Police Department Headquarters.

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Crime
4:17 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Teen Dies In Durham Police Custody

A teenager died in a Durham police car in the department’s headquarters parking lot early Tuesday after the officer driving him heard "a loud noise" in the car, authorities said. 

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The State of Things
11:46 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Reports Of Police Spying Raise Concerns Of Overreach

Credit Matthew Lenard

General Assembly Police Chief Jeff Weaver testified recently that law enforcement officers collected intelligence on participants in Moral Monday protests. Police officials say the measures were necessary to ensure public safety. Critics say the move went too far.

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