Mary Kratt in rhododendron at age 6
Mary Kratt

Historian and author Mary Kratt grew up in the countryside surrounded by trees, the occasional quail hunter and not much else. As a little girl she spent a lot of time on her own and became a keen observer of her surroundings and other people, and she says that’s exactly why she is a successful poet today. 

Kratt has authored six poetry books and a number of books and essays on Charlotte history.

Image of Amber Flora Thomas, a poet and creative writing professor at East Carolina University.
Amber Flora Thomas

Amber Flora Thomas was in many ways destined to be an artist. Her mother is a painter, her father was a sculptor, and they valued creativity more than almost anything else.

She spent most of her childhood in cars, tents and trailers as they traveled from art show to art show. And though she tried to stray from a creative career and pursue a degree in political science so that she could become a lawyer, she found that she was continually drawn back to writing.

Image of Nathaniel Mackey, who is one of the country's most respected poets and recently released his new book 'Blue Fasa.'
Andrew Tie


Poet Nathaniel Mackey is one of the most respected experimental writers in the country today. In recent years, the Duke professor has received many honors including the Poetry Foundation’s Ruth Lilly Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Book Award and, most recently, Yale University’s Bollingen Prize.

Image of "Soon," the latest collection of short stories written by Pam Durban, a creative writing professor at UNC.
University of South Carolina Press

The characters of Pam Durban’s short stories face a variety of challenges on different fronts - grief, identity, interpersonal relationships.

But the common thread that binds them all is storytelling. Durban’s latest collection of short stories is Soon (University of South Carolina Press/2015).  

Host Frank Stasio talks with Durban, professor of creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Flickr/Fredrik Rubensson

Media consumers now have more information at their fingertips than ever before, and there is far more news available than any one person could possibly absorb. Writers and journalists are pushed to communicate more succinctly and shorten stories in order to pique readers’ attention.

But a group of artists are trying to buck this trend with an online venue that encourages writers to do exactly the opposite. At Length is a forum for long-form, in-depth writing, art, music and photography.

Domestic Garden

Apr 30, 2015
John Hoppenthaler's new book of poems is an exploration of age and marriage.
Annie Hogan / Carnegie Mellon University Press

When John Hoppenthaler wrote his newest book of poetry, Domestic Garden (Carnegie Mellon University Press/2015), he was experiencing change in his personal life.

The poet and professor at East Carolina University married just before turning 50 years old, and he also became a stepfather. At the same time, his mother’s health was declining. 

The transitions became the backbone of his intimate and vulnerable poetry.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Hoppenthaler about his life, work and poetry.

A selection of images and poems by husband and wife artist team Michael Platt and Carol Beane. Their  exhibit “Ritual + Time Travel=Rebirth” is on view at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History.
Michael Platt and Carol Beane

Husband and wife artist team Michael Platt and Carol Beane co-create work that explores rites, rituals and the lives of people living on the margins of history.

Shelby Stephenson (left) is North Carolina's new Poet Laureate.

North Carolina's new poet laureate, Shelby Stephenson, will be installed Monday, February 2, 2015. 

Greensboro poet David Roderick's newest collection, The Americans (University of Pittsburgh Press/2014), examines the social aspects that define the country.

A child of the classic American suburb, Roderick found the definition lies somewhere in the middle of our history, our perceptions and the American dream.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Roderick about The Americans.

Regarding My Son
Finishing Line Press


When Sonia Usatch-Kuhn's son was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, she started keeping a diary of sorts.

She wrote poetry about the devastating moments when her son was institutionalized, and when he did not speak for two years. She also wrote poetry about the moments of joy when he began to distinguish reality from his paranoia and hallucinations.

Sonia’s writings are now a book of poetry that follows the story from her son’s diagnosis 35 years ago to his life today.