Novel

Leon Capetanos

As a kid growing up in Raleigh Leon Capetanos never imagined that he’d spend most of his life out West. He was an aspiring poet and studied writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After participating in a talent program in Hollywood, he got a call from Universal Studios to join their writing department, and his career took off from there.

The Last Good Girl

May 26, 2016
photo of "The Last Good Girl" by Allison Leotta
Allison Leotta

The statistics about campus sexual assault are staggering: one in five women is assaulted during her time on campus, and the vast majority of these assaults go unreported.

Advocates and survivors across the country have pushed to bring the issue to the forefront, and in the past few years, there has been increased attention paid to how universities are responding to students' needs.

Travis Mulhauser

For a number of years, there was one particular image that continued to haunt Travis Mulhauser: a young girl in a hooded sweatshirt who comes across an abandoned baby. He eventually decided to let his imagination play out her story, and it resulted in his debut novel “Sweetgirl” (Harper Collins/2016). The book follows 16-year-old Percy James, whose search for her mother in the dead of winter takes her on an unexpected journey.

Image of 'Forsaken' cover by Ross Howell Jr.
New South Books

Virginia Christian is the only African-American juvenile woman ever executed in the state of Virginia. She was executed the day after her 17th birthday in 1912.

This fact is the backdrop for the historical novel "Forsaken" (New South Books/2016). The book tells the story of Christian through the lens of a young, idealist reporter Charles Mears. It's a tale woven with historical fact and fictional narrative that combines racial prejudice with hope and redemption.

Carla Buckley's latest novel is 'The Good Goodbye,' a story that explores how much parents want to know about the secret lives their children lead.
Brian Killian

Chapel Hill novelist Carla Buckley grew up in a family of secrets. When it was time to start her own family, she decided she would always be upfront and honest with her children.

Image of 'Noah's Wife' galleys
Lindsay Starck

The story of Noah’s ark has a life that extends far beyond the pages of the Bible.

Images of animals walking two by two are ubiquitous in pop culture; the baby gift industry is filled with Noah’s ark-themed toys and decorative items. But one North Carolina author was perplexed by the fact that many of these popular images seemed to indicate that Noah’s story is cheerful and optimistic.

Nina de Gramont
Nina de Gramont

Wilmington author Nina de Gramont has based her newest novel on her own experiences during the offseason in Cape Cod.

The thrill of the deserted landscape makes for a unique experience, but the chill of an empty town provides the perfect inspiration for a love story that turns into a murder mystery. 

A Stone For Bread

Oct 27, 2015
Miriam Herin is out with her second novel, 'A Stone For Bread,' which looks for the truth with a mysterious set of poems from a Nazi death camp.
Tom Herin

In the mid-20th century, Henry Beam was a promising young poet from Cleveland County. On a trip to Paris, he returned with poems he claimed were saved from a Nazi death camp. This became his undoing as allegations of plagiarism cost him his job and career.

Three decades later, Beam broke his silence and told his life story to a UNC graduate student. What she discovers is a complex experience in France: Beam’s love affair, his sketchy situation with a right-wing politician and his encounter with a mysterious man who supposedly gave him the poems.

Michael Keenan Gutierrez
Rebecca Ames

Neal Stephens is a photographer who returned to his hometown in Colorado after World War I to find another war raging in the little coal town: a conflict between union miners and Neal's uncle, Seamus, who runs the mine.

 

In the course of the labor fight, the local sheriff is found dead, and Neal stumbles across a larger conspiracy that could end his family's mining company and land him in prison for murder.

 

Ron Rash
www.wcu.edu

Ron Rash is a critically acclaimed novelist who has won many accolades for his five novels, including Serena and World Made Straight.

When Rash penned his most recent work, he began with a single image: dead trout in a stream. From there, he knew he wanted to craft a narrative about hope and he used the relationship between a sheriff and a park ranger to do just that.

Pages