Novel

Abandoned farmhouse western North Carolina
Julia Franks

Eight years ago, Julia Franks and her husband bought a farm in western North Carolina. At the time, the 1800s farmhouse on the land was still standing and when they walked in the doors, they were greeted by dozens of odd artifacts, including animal bones, locks of hair, insect hives, and even a jar with a fingernail in it. Franks is a high school literature teacher and lover of writing, so it was hard for her to not let her imagination run wild.

Leon Capetanos

This show originally aired on May 27, 2016.

As a kid growing up in Raleigh Leon Capetanos never imagined that he’d spend most of his life out West. He was an aspiring poet and studied writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After participating in a talent program in Hollywood, he got a call from Universal Studios to join their writing department, and his career took off from there.

Travis Mulhauser

Note: this program is a rebroadcast.

For a number of years, there was one particular image that continued to haunt Travis Mulhauser: a young girl in a hooded sweatshirt who comes across an abandoned baby. He eventually decided to let his imagination play out her story, and it resulted in his debut novel “Sweetgirl” (Harper Collins/2016). The book follows 16-year-old Percy James, whose search for her mother in the dead of winter takes her on an unexpected journey.

The Last Good Girl

May 26, 2016
photo of "The Last Good Girl" by Allison Leotta
Allison Leotta

The statistics about campus sexual assault are staggering: one in five women is assaulted during her time on campus, and the vast majority of these assaults go unreported.

Advocates and survivors across the country have pushed to bring the issue to the forefront, and in the past few years, there has been increased attention paid to how universities are responding to students' needs.

Image of 'Forsaken' cover by Ross Howell Jr.
New South Books

Virginia Christian is the only African-American juvenile woman ever executed in the state of Virginia. She was executed the day after her 17th birthday in 1912.

This fact is the backdrop for the historical novel "Forsaken" (New South Books/2016). The book tells the story of Christian through the lens of a young, idealist reporter Charles Mears. It's a tale woven with historical fact and fictional narrative that combines racial prejudice with hope and redemption.

Carla Buckley's latest novel is 'The Good Goodbye,' a story that explores how much parents want to know about the secret lives their children lead.
Brian Killian

Chapel Hill novelist Carla Buckley grew up in a family of secrets. When it was time to start her own family, she decided she would always be upfront and honest with her children.

Image of 'Noah's Wife' galleys
Lindsay Starck

The story of Noah’s ark has a life that extends far beyond the pages of the Bible.

Images of animals walking two by two are ubiquitous in pop culture; the baby gift industry is filled with Noah’s ark-themed toys and decorative items. But one North Carolina author was perplexed by the fact that many of these popular images seemed to indicate that Noah’s story is cheerful and optimistic.

Nina de Gramont
Nina de Gramont

Wilmington author Nina de Gramont has based her newest novel on her own experiences during the offseason in Cape Cod.

The thrill of the deserted landscape makes for a unique experience, but the chill of an empty town provides the perfect inspiration for a love story that turns into a murder mystery. 

A Stone For Bread

Oct 27, 2015
Miriam Herin is out with her second novel, 'A Stone For Bread,' which looks for the truth with a mysterious set of poems from a Nazi death camp.
Tom Herin

In the mid-20th century, Henry Beam was a promising young poet from Cleveland County. On a trip to Paris, he returned with poems he claimed were saved from a Nazi death camp. This became his undoing as allegations of plagiarism cost him his job and career.

Three decades later, Beam broke his silence and told his life story to a UNC graduate student. What she discovers is a complex experience in France: Beam’s love affair, his sketchy situation with a right-wing politician and his encounter with a mysterious man who supposedly gave him the poems.

Michael Keenan Gutierrez
Rebecca Ames

Neal Stephens is a photographer who returned to his hometown in Colorado after World War I to find another war raging in the little coal town: a conflict between union miners and Neal's uncle, Seamus, who runs the mine.

 

In the course of the labor fight, the local sheriff is found dead, and Neal stumbles across a larger conspiracy that could end his family's mining company and land him in prison for murder.

 

Ron Rash
www.wcu.edu

Ron Rash is a critically acclaimed novelist who has won many accolades for his five novels, including Serena and World Made Straight.

When Rash penned his most recent work, he began with a single image: dead trout in a stream. From there, he knew he wanted to craft a narrative about hope and he used the relationship between a sheriff and a park ranger to do just that.

Pediatric oncologist Dr. Raymond Barfield has always loved storytelling. As a child he would often sit and listen to his grandfather tell tales, and in college he sought out the work of philosophers who illustrated their ideas with specific stories.

The Hunters

Jul 16, 2015
Image of the cover of Tom Young's newest novel, 'The Hunters.'
Tom Young

Author Tom Young is back with another novel about the adventures of Colonel Michael Parson. In The Hunters (Putnam/2015), the protagonist flies relief supplies into Somalia in an antique DC-3 cargo plane for a charitable organization.

Unfortunately, things get complicated when an al-Shabaab leader declares all aid a sin against God, and he begins launching attacks against planes and convoys to stop them. 

Image of Michelle Miller, the author of 'The Underwriting,' a corporate satire of Wall Street and Silicon Valley.
Sasha Israel

Michelle Miller’s life has taken her from her hometown of Asheville to the depths of two important economic engines in America – Wall Street and Silicon Valley.

She studied business at Stanford, got a job at financial giant JP Morgan, and then gave it all up to become an author. She wrote a 12-part online serial last year, drawing on her experiences from the financial and tech worlds.

Image of Allison Leotta, who wanted to show the ways the criminal justice system does and doesn't work in her books.
Allison Leotta

Allison Leotta was a federal sex-crimes prosecutor in Washington D.C. for more than a decade. Every day when she came home from work, she would think to herself, “I can’t believe what I saw today…someone should write about this.”

She began writing in the mornings before work and at night when she got home. In 2011, Leotta left the Justice Department to write full-time. She has now written four novels about a prosecutor named Anna Curtis, and people often refer to Leotta as “the female John Grisham.”

N.C. author Liza Wieland
East Carolina University

For North Carolina author Liza Wieland, three separate narratives converged to her new book, Land of Enchantment.

The novel traces the experiences of three multiracial women in three different parts of the country. The characters share common themes around love, loss, racial identity and art. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with writer and English professor at East Carolina University Liza Wieland.

Author Sharon Draper has been writing award-winning young adult fiction for years. 

The cover of Mette Ivie Harrison's The Bishop's Wife.
http://sohopress.com/

Linda Wallheim is a stay-at-home wife who is married to quite possibly the most influential man in her Mormon community of Draper, Utah. 

    

When Sharon Ewell Foster first published her novel Passing by Samaria in the late 1990s, it was a time of relative racial peace throughout the United States.

Reading F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby is a rite of passage these days. The novel is mandatory reading for many high schoolers across the country. 

    

Writer Charlie Lovett has been attracted to the mystique of old books since he was a young kid. 

The Ice Garden

Nov 12, 2014

The characters in Moira Crone’s new book The Ice Garden (Carolina Wren Press/2014) have been rattling about in the author’s head for decades. 

The cover of Anna Quindlen's novel Still Life with Bread Crumbs
Random House

  

As a reporter, columnist, mother, coveted commencement speaker, and novelist, Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times Bestselling author Anna Quindlen has never been afraid of redefining herself.

  

Whether or not women can have both professional success and a family is an ongoing national conversation, spurred by high-profile magazine essays, viral blogs and books like Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In.

What would an author write on the "thank you" page of her novel if she was telling the truth? Pittsboro author Ruth Moose wrote the acknowledgments of her debut novel, Doing It At the Dixie Dew, with a candor atypical of many authors.

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