North Carolina Museum Of Art

Givenchy by Alexander McQueen, evening gown
Courtesy of NC Art Museum

In 1958, African-American women donned designer dresses and walked the runway for the first Ebony Fashion Fair. 

The charity fashion show was the brainchild of Ebony Magazine co-publisher Eunice Johnson and it showed African-American women as rich and successful. The fair ran for 50 years, and in that time it continued to be a space where African-American women could re-imagine their role in American society and reclaim their beauty.

members of diali cissokho and kaira ba
Courtesy of Diali Cissokho and Kaira Ba

Diali Cissokho and Kaira Ba have long had a dream of traveling to Senegal to record an album. This year they made it happen. The band just returned from M’bour, Cissokho’s hometown and the city where his family still maintains a large compound open to musical relatives and friends. 

The Green Party of Ireland/Flickr Creative Commons

Are school movies enjoyable because they are so relatable? Or do they present the far-fetched, fantastical experiences most bored students only daydream about? 

Leonard Bernstein seated at piano, making annotations to musical score
Al Ravenna, World Telegram staff photographer / ce Library of Congress. New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c27784

Leonard Bernstein is remembered as an exceptionally talented conductor, composer and teacher. His “Young People’s Concerts” television series exposed millions of American children to classical music, and his message that music is for everyone struck a chord with many communities. 

Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck in 'Roman Holiday'
Classic Film / Flickr - Creative Commons -https://flic.kr/p/VkLRWH

Vacation movies may show off some of the world’s most beautiful scenery, but the most compelling films are the ones that show characters another side of themselves. Take a protagonist out of her usual environment and anything can happen.

Image of two best friends
Flickr/ Stuart Seeger

Best friends are the constant in many people's lives. They rescue each other when a car breaks down. They join go on late-night quests for fast food. And they console and support each other in a time of need. The relationships of best friends have been fodder for movie plot lines for decades and exist in all genres.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Film remakes can introduce a beloved film to a new audience or take a mediocre movie to a new level of greatness. But when a remake is badly executed, it can butcher a cherished classic. On this edition of “Movies on the Radio,” film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes pick apart the artistry of a remake.

Joe Wolf / Flickr Creative Commons

Dystopian films take viewers to cities in the sky and barren, post-apocalyptic landscapes. They explore futuristic universes while also tapping into the darker side of the human condition. 

In this episode of "Movies on the Radio," listeners discuss their favorite dystopian films. Host Frank Stasio talks with experts Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about how dystopian art emerges from societal reaction to politics and government.

Laura Boyes will host a screening of the 1930 Film "King of Jazz" at Friday, April 21 at 8 p.m. at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. 

And on May 5, you can catch Marsha Gordon at a special screening of The Big Red One at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh. 

http://www.artcuriouspodcast.com

Is the Mona Lisa hanging on the wall in the Louvre a fake? Why have some people been driven to insanity after being in the presence of art?

In a new podcast called “ArtCurious,” Jennifer Dasal, creator of the podcast and associate curator of contemporary art at the North Carolina Museum of Art, unravels some of the mysteries surrounding the art world.

A promotional still with John Wayne and Claire Trevor from the 1939 American Western film 'Stagecoach'.
Wikimedia Commons

A gun-slinging cowboy on a mission of revenge takes down the enemy in a quick-draw duel.  He then rides off on his trusted steed with the setting sun casting long shadows on the rugged landscape. This is one of the iconic narratives in Western film, a genre which has gone through a massive evolution since its “good versus evil” and “cowboys versus Indians” days.

Courtesy of Zanele Muholi

In 2006, South Africa became the fifth country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage. While social justice activists around the world saw this event as a tremendous victory, the country was still in a lot of turmoil. Homophobic hate crimes and violence were on the rise, and many individuals reported being subject to “curative rape,” a hate crime in which someone is raped to “cure” them of their sexual identity.

Screenshot from Zootopia
BagoGames / Flickr

From Jungle Book to Jaws and Babe to The Lion King, the stars of the silver screen are often not humans but instead are our four-legged friends. Though no animal has ever won an Oscar, viewers have embraced animal actors and characters in film.

photo of 'The Dude Abides Party'
Ashley Sue Bullers/North Carolina Museum of Art

Summer is here and so are summer festivals. While big events like MerleFest or the National Folk Festival get much of the attention, many smaller festivals scattered throughout the state highlight the varied cultural communities in North Carolina.

Host Frank Stasio talks with festival organizers about this summer’s lineup, from the Highland Games in the west to the Yam Festival in the east.


photo from "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Moni3 [Public Domain] / Wikimedia Commons

Most movies are sources of adventure and excitement, but some films can also be a source of temptation. Whether a movie was off-limits by your parents or banned by the church, a forbidden film can often be all the more enticing to watch. Maybe your parents thought the dinosaur eating a man off the toilet in "Jurassic Park" was too violent, or that "To Kill a Mockingbird" talked about taboo topics.

photo of "Woodstock" by Burk Uzzle
Burk Uzzle

Burk Uzzle remembers taking pictures at the bus station when he was just a teenager living in eastern North Carolina. In high school, he worked part-time as a photographer for the News & Observer and eventually became the youngest photographer hired by LIFE magazine. Throughout the years, Uzzle captured iconic images of Martin Luther King Jr. and Woodstock, and his archive now spans six decades and prominently features images of his Southern roots.

photo of Lake Street Dive
Danny Clinch

The Brooklyn quartet Lake Street Dive met as students at the New England Conservatory of Music, but the group's musical roots date back decades to the vintage sounds of Motown and The Beatles. The band members channel their jazz training through soul pop arrangements to create a harmonious mix of influences on their latest album, "Side Pony."

Orson Welles directed, produced, co-authored, and starred in 'Citizen Kane,' considered by many as the greatest film ever made.
Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

The 1941 film Citizen Kane is considered by many to be one of the best films of all time. Its daring subject matter, bold visuals, and unique style made Orson Welles a household name.

Fire Pink Trio recently released their first album, "Poetry in Motion."
Melanie Hatton / Firepinktrio.com

The classical music group Fire Pink Trio gets its name from the vibrant mountain wildflower that grows throughout North America.

They bring the same energy and creative force to their work, from the classics of Brahms to the contemporary pieces of North Carolina composer Dan Locklair. And their experience as educators allows them to pass on the sound to the next generation of classical musicians. The trio released a debut album last month: Poetry in Motion: Music for Flute, Viola, and Harp. 

Beaufort, NC
3.26 via Creative Commons/Flickr

Courtesy of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, here are eight ideas for the long weekend:

Photo of Backup Singer Lisa Fischer on stage with The Rolling Stones
flickr/ aka Francois aka Mister Pink

Lisa Fischer has made a career singing backup vocals for artists from Mick Jagger and Luther Vandross to Dolly Parton and the Nine Inch Nails. She sang this solo rendition of "Breath of Heaven" live on The State of Things:

Photo of Backup Singer Lisa Fischer on stage with The Rolling Stones
flickr/ aka Francois aka Mister Pink

    

Lisa Fischer is one of the most in-demand vocalists in the music industry, but she rarely takes center stage.

North Carolina Museum of Art

Mexican-American and Latino printmaking has strong roots in political activism. In the sixties, printmaking was used primarily to make posters, graphics and cartoons that would convey political messages and assist with community organizing. 

I really love the story that's been in the news for a day or so about the painting, "Portrait of Madame X Dressed For the Matinee." A Winston-Salem woman, Charlotte Hanes, and some anonymous donors, gifted the painting to the NC Museum of Art. It's a major addition to the museum's collection.

The picture is lovely, of course. Mary Cassatt painted the work at what would become important time in her career. But what captures my imagination is not the significance of the painting to the art world, but what the subject is wearing.

Edvard Munch

Dec 13, 2012
The Scream
www.moma.org

Edvard Munch’s most famous painting is “The Scream.” It depicts a skeletal figure holding his hands against his face in horror. This image has been reproduced and parodied the world over. But Edvard Munch's life and other works are largely unknown to the general public.

It's no secret that there's a lack of compelling roles for women in Hollywood. Often, they are confined to adoring secretaries or sex objects, but in the noir films of the 1940s and ‘50s, the femme fatale uses her cunning and sex appeal to get the better of men.

El Anatsui
NCMA

A new exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Art offers visitors an unprecedented chance to follow the 40 year career of one of Africa’s most celebrated contemporary artists.

Rembrandt at Museum of Art

Oct 28, 2011
''Self-portrait'' by Rembrandt
NC Museum of Art

Rembrandt. We know the name, but do we know the work? A new exhibition is at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, with a special free preview day today. “Rembrandt in America” highlights both the authentic and inauthentic Rembrandt paintings side by side.

30 Americans at NCMA

May 27, 2011
Hank Willis Thomas, ''Branded Head,'' 2003
Rubell Family Collection, Miami.

  The North Carolina Museum of Art continues to celebrate an exhibit where at least three generations of African American artists boldly explore history, culture and pop culture.  The “30 Americans” exhibit is said to be the largest contemporary African American art exhibit in the country.  All of the pieces in the show come from the Rubell Family of Miami who established their collection in the mid-1960s.  

Rockwell, `The Problem We All Live With,` 1963, oil on canvas, 36 x 58in., Illustration for Look, Jan. 14, 1964
Norman Rockwell Museum Collection, NRM. 1975.1, Licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing, Niles, Ill.

American Chronicles – The Art of Norman Rockwell is currently on display at the North Carolina Museum of Art.  It has traveled the country since last Spring.  The exhibit includes some 40 original oil paintings – chronicling six decades of Rockwell’s work – and a complete set of more than 300 Saturday Evening Post covers.  Rockwell was meticulous in creating scenes of American life – whimsical and idyllic.  During the latter part of his life – he took his work out of New England and captured what was transforming the south – the Civil Rights movement.