North Carolina

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Scientific journals are periodically forced to issue retractions of scientific papers. It is a decision no scientist or publisher wants to make, but in some cases studies with major inaccuracies, or even fraud, manage to find their way into scientific publications. 

Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert Brazzell / Wikimedia Commons -2017

Two-thirds of states used chronic absenteeism as a metric for school evaluation in recently submitted federal plans.

Diane Chamerlain, cover of 'Stolen Marriage'
Images courtesy of Diane Chamberlain.

In 1944 a polio outbreak swept across the Hickory and Charlotte area of North Carolina. Facilities in Charlotte quickly filled up with patients, leaving many in Hickory without proper treatment. In dire need of a medical facility, residents in Hickory banded together and built, outfitted and staffed an emergency hospital within 54 hours. The event came to be known as “The Miracle of Hickory.”
 

Courtesy of Jeremy Markovich

Writer Jeremy Markovich decided to go far away to find new stories. In fact, he wanted to go as far from any possible road as he could get in North Carolina.

National Guard soldiers in Houston in August of 2017
Texas Army National Guard photo / FBI

Floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey still filled the streets in Texas when Hurricane Irma blew ashore in Florida. As the latest storm moves toward North Carolina, Duke scientists explore whether these rare weather events are growing more frequent or more extreme. They also analyze how communities and governments can become more resilient.

Big Dubya / Flickr - Creative Commons

A federal voter fraud commission’s request for voter data from individual states has prompted concern from voters and politicians. The commission was formed at the behest of President Trump in reaction to claims of widespread voter fraud. In North Carolina the state elections board is facing a wave of calls from voters who want to voice opposition, or even cancel their voter registration in reaction to the federal data request.

Image of multicolor gems. A new PBS NOVA series explores gems and precious stones, some found right in North Carolina.
PBS NOVA

Hiddenite, North Carolina, is a tiny community with a big secret. Emeralds, some of the largest in the world, along with sapphires, and other precious stones lay hidden under the earth at this site in Alexander County. A new series of the popular PBS show NOVA, titled “Treasures of the Earth,” takes a deeper look at the science behind this local phenomenon.

Headshot of Roy Cooper
Courtesy of Roy Cooper

With the election less than three weeks away, the national spotlight is on North Carolina as a key swing state in this election. The latest polls in the governor’s race show incumbent Governor Pat McCrory head-to-head with democratic challenger Attorney General Roy Cooper.

Profile photo of Mark Dreibelbis from the NCHSAA.
www.nchsaa.org/ / www.nchsaa.org/

For Mark Dreibelbis, not much is more exciting than the world of high school sports. From the fans to the rules, he loves every minute. As an associate commissioner with the North Carolina High School Athletic Association, Dreibelbis serves on national committees that have adopted a host of new rules in recent years aimed at keeping student athletes safe.

Merge Records Co-Founder and Frontman for the indie band Superchunk, Mac McCaughan professional photo.
Lissa Gotwals / Merge Records

Mac McCaughan has been creating heartfelt and catchy music in North Carolina for 25 years.

He has released more than 15 albums, both with his long-running indie rock band, Superchunk, and his semi-solo project Portastatic. 

Until now, he never released an album under his own name. On Tuesday, McCaughan releases his first official solo debut Non-Believers. The album is inspired by the early 1980’s era of music when punk rock was evolving.

Host Frank Stasio talks with McCaughan about the album and his work. 

Gun wall featuring rifles and assault riffles.
Michael Saechang - flickr.com/photos/saechang

Craig Stephen Hicks, the man accused of killing three young people in Chapel Hill this February, could face the death penalty. A Durham County Superior Court judge ruled Monday that the prosecution brought forth enough incriminating evidence to make him eligible for a death sentence.