NC Governor

The Republican-controlled North Carolina Legislature has introduced measures to limit the powers of the incoming Democratic governor.

Roy Cooper, the state's current attorney general, beat current Republican Gov. Pat McCrory by a slim margin in the November election. McCrory initially refused to concede until a vote recount proved he had lost by about 10,000 votes.

The modern day race for political office includes a series of competitions for endorsements and money. And the race for chief executive of North Carolina is no exception.

Republican Governor Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper have each raised millions of dollars in advance of a gubernatorial election that is expected to be among the closest in the country.

A Republican congressman charts his course in a Democratic capital.
The Martin Family

Jim Martin was the first and only two-term Republican governor in North Carolina, serving from 1985-1993.

 

A Duke Energy power plant and coal ash ponds outside Asheville.
Zen Sutherland

Governor Pat McCrory says he plans to sign a bill to manage North Carolina’s coal ash ponds. But he may also challenge a key part of it.

The governor played a role this summer when members of the House and Senate were crafting the  plan. He made suggestions of his own on what to do with Duke Energy's 100 million tons of coal ash.

The bill is now on his desk. Over the weekend, on the talk show NC Spin, his support for it was cautious.

Gov. Pat McCrory
Governor's Office

Governor McCrory is the subject of a new TV ad that seeks to boost his image.

A non-profit group called Renew North Carolina has bought at least 150 thousand dollars' worth of advertising time in the state's three largest television markets. They're scheduled to run over the next month. In one ad on the group's website, Governor McCrory talks about education, tax, and health care reform.

Image of NC General Assembly where lawmakers are considering two controversial bills.
Credit NC General Assembly

The North Carolina General Assembly goes back into session Tuesday. Lawmakers will consider Governor Pat McCrory’s vetoes of two bills. One requires drug testing for certain welfare recipients. The other grants immigration exemptions for some seasonal workers.

The succession of North Carolina Governors poster.
NC Bankers Association

Curious to know what all the North Carolina governors looked like? Now you can see all 68 (well, most of them) in one place, thanks to the North Carolina Bankers Association. They’ve reissued their poster of the state’s gubernatorial lineage, which hadn’t been updated in more than 50 years.  

Gov. Pat McCrory
Governor's Office

The General Assembly recently finished up their lawmaking session, passing a variety of legislation, some of which has stirred quite a bit of controversy locally and nationally. All that’s left now is for Governor Pat McCrory to sign those laws of which he approves and veto those he’s against. He’s done both this week.

He signed into law a controversial Voter ID law that forces voters to show ID at the polling place, as well as shortens the hours of early voting and eliminates straight-ticket voting.

Gov. Pat McCrory
NC Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory gave his first press conference in six months at the governor's mansion today.

He said he and legislators are coming close to reaching an agreement on tax reform, which would pave the way for producing a state budget.

McCrory also said the Senate's quick passage of a bill last week that would result in shutting down most of the state's abortion clinics was not the best way to pass such a controversial measure. McCrory said there's a fine line between restrictions on abortion and safety measures that protect women.

Former NC Governor Jim Holshouser
The family of Jim Holshouser

Former North Carolina Governor Jim Holshouser has died.  Holshouser's family says he died this morning at a hospital in Pinehurst.  A native of Boone, he was North Carolina's first Republican governor in the 20th century, serving from 1973 to 1977.  Holshouser received an undergraduate degree from Davidson College and a law degree from UNC Chapel Hill. 

While in office, Holshouser created a UNC Board of Governors and supported the expansion of public school kindergartens. He also established rural health clinics and added to the state parks system.

Last Friday, Gov. Pat McCrory appointed an entirely new staff to the North Carolina State Board of Elections. Earlier that week the board was set to begin an investigation into contributions to McCrory's campaign. A one-hundred percent turnover is unusual and leaves many speculating whether or not it has to do with this investigation.

John Frank is a political reporter for the News and Observer and joined Host Frank Stasio today to talk about the turnover.