NC Department of Cultural Resources

People First Tourism, NC State, Chris Smith
People First Tourism

A new tourism venture aims to help travelers wander off the “beaten path” and help small entrepreneurs at the same time.

It’s called “People First Tourism.”  Duarte Morais is an Associate Professor of Equitable and Sustainable Tourism at NC State.  He is also the CEO of "People First Tourism."  He says money can be made by providing authentic experiences for visitors.

“For tourism to really benefit local communities there should be a lot of locals involved in tourism as small business owners," said Morais.

Jockey's Ridge
Dave DeWitt

Governor Pat McCrory is expected to release his state budget proposal this week. It will likely spark the usual fights over Medicaid and teacher pay. But buried inside the budget will be a major reorganization of state government that could impact the millions of visitors to North Carolina’s state parks, science museums, aquariums, and even the Zoo.

The move involves the Department of Environment and Natural Resources and the various attractions it manages: two science museums in Raleigh, 35 state parks, three aquariums, even Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head.

A cannon raised from Blackbeard's Queen Anne Revenge on Friday, August 16, 2013.
NC Dept. of Cultural Resources

Researchers off the North Carolina coast are on dive number two for the year. Their goal is to recover artifacts from the wreck of Blackbeard's flagship, Queen Anne's Revenge, which ran aground near Beaufort nearly 300 years ago.

Project Director Bill Ray Morris says this excavation will focus on the forward part of the ship near the bow.

Remains of the CSS Neuse being moved by truck through Downtown Kinston.
NC Dept. of Cultural Resources

A Civil War ironclad ship used by the Confederacy has a new home in eastern North Carolina.  The CSS Neuse Civil War Interpretive Center, now open in Kinston, displays what’s left of the ship.

The Neuse was launched near there in 1863 and was meant to help the Confederate Army along the coast of the Carolinas, but the ship ran aground in the Neuse River, and the army used it as support during an inland skirmish in 1865. 

A cannon excavated from Blackbeard's ship, Queen Anne's Revenge.
Karen K Browning; N.C. Department of Cultural Resources

State archeologists say they have the ambitious goal of recovering eight cannons from Blackbeard's ship.  The Queen Anne's Revenge sunk near Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina, in June of 1718, and the state Department of Cultural Resources has been leading efforts to recover artifacts from the ship since 1997. Divers use good weather during the summer and fall months to bring artifacts to the surface.  Last week, bad weather prevented divers from starting their yearly digs, but Fay Mitchell of the Department of Cultural Resources says they hope to surface up to three sunken cannons this week.

One of the rules of the U.S. Census is that all names must be kept anonymous for 72 years. Historians, genealogists and demographers are eagerly awaiting next week’s big reveal of 1940 Census data - names included.