Nature

Partial solar eclipse
T. Ruen / NASA Goddard via Twitter

There will be a partial solar eclipse tonight at 6:00. The eclipse is expected to last about three hours. Such an eclipse occurs when the moon obscures part of the sun.

Wood Duck
Ellerbee Creek Watershed Association

Honking horns, slamming doors and congested streets: these are the sounds and sites of a bustling city. 

Alison Moyer poses with Dreadnoughtus' neck bone, which she uncovered.
Alison Moyer

Last week, researchers revealed one of the biggest discoveries ever in the dinosaur world. "Dreadnoughtus" is 85 feet long, two stories tall, and as big as a jumbo jet. It's estimated to weigh as much as seven T. rex dinosaurs put together, and experts believe it was not yet fully grown when it died. Alison Moyer spent several months on her knees in southern Argentina using picks, dust brushes, and tweezers to uncover parts of Dreadnoughtus' skeleton. Moyer is a Ph.D candidate at N.C. State University. This was her first dig.

What was your role?

This is an example of the style of graphic in the textbook
E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation

Attention teachers and lifelong learners: noted naturalist and biologist Dr. Edward O. Wilson has a new product out that just might make you swoon. It's a gorgeous high-tech interactive textbook series with full-color photos, 3D animations and interviews with working scientists. It's aligned with educational standards and it's free.

A Mystery Tree Grows In Chapel Hill

Jun 10, 2014
redwood
Parth Shah

For most people, taking care of the front yard means cutting the grass every few weeks.

But for Bill Massengale, lawn care involves looking after the lofty California coastal redwood growing in the front yard of his law office on Columbia Street.

“When we bought the place we were told that the only thing we had to do was to make sure nothing happens to the redwood,” Massengale says. “It’s one of my chief duties in life."

Southern Cricket Frog in Person County, NC.
Catherine Stevens / http://www.flickr.com/photos/chiral_c/

You might be forgiven for thinking the apocalypse is underway. Recently on the State of Things we’ve talked about the mass deaths of both bees and bats and the scary implications for the rest of us. Today, we’re going to talk about the death of frogs. Jonathan Micancin says that this problem has been with us a long time. In fact, it could have been the first sign that something may be going horribly wrong in the environment.

Little brown bat; close-up of nose with fungus, New York, Oct. 2008.
Photo courtesy Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation

An emerging disease known as White Nose Syndrome has wiped out bats across the Northeast, and now it's spreading in the North Carolina mountains.

Mass bat die-offs could have huge implications for the state's ecology and economy.

Peter Goin: Humanature / petergoin.com

Photographer Peter Goin thinks nature isn’t all its cracked up to be, and he’s not sure just how natural it really is. He has an exhibit up at the Gregg Museum of Art & Design at North Carolina State University called “Humanature. It’s a collection of photographs documenting the ways in which humans shape and create nature, and it explores ideas about the nature of reality and artifice. Host Frank Stasio talks to Peter Goin, a professor of art in photography and videography at the University of Nevada, Reno.