Native Americans

Penelope Easton ventured to the Alaskan territory as a young woman in 1948. It would have been an intimidating move for many young women in that era. But for Easton, the move was just another in a series of adventures across the globe.

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

  

Chapel-Hill based band Dark Water Rising mixes southern rock, gospel harmonies, and traditional Lumbee influence to create their "rocky soul" sound. They got together in 2008, when none of them had any formal music training. Since then, they have gained local and national recognition throughout Native American communities. 

NH Public Television/Nature Works

Starting this month a group of white tailed deer will be transported from Morrow Mountain State Park onto 56,000 acres of reservation lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

It's a project sponsored by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and the Cherokee Fisheries and Wildlife Management Program.

The move will help augment the reservation's population of deer which has been declining over the years.

Duke University
Duke University

Since 2010, the number of American Indian students in the UNC system has been declining.

Today, there are 87 American Indian students in a student population of 19,000 undergraduate students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Wikimedia Commons

  

Many people know that during the Trail of Tears, tens of thousands of American Indians were forced to walk to Oklahoma.

Wikimedia Commons

    

The Lumbee are the largest American Indian nation east of the Mississippi River and many of them live in Robeson County, North Carolina.

Many of the Lumbee people worked in the manufacturing business in the county, but since the 1980s and 1990s, the industry has declined. Students and faculty at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke have studied the intersection between Lumbee identity and working-class life in Robeson County.

UNC Press

    

In the 1600s, European settlers invaded Eastern North Carolina where nations like the Tuscarora, Machapunga, and Core Indians resided.

Poet Natalie Diaz
coppercanyonpress.org

Natalie Diaz grew up on the Fort Mojave Indian Reservation. While many of those around her struggled with the lack of opportunities, she saw basketball as her way out.

South Carolina Historical Society

Three hundred years ago this week, European colonialists in what is now eastern North Carolina fought a battle that devastated an American Indian tribe. A symposium at East Carolina University marks the anniversary of the 1713 battle, in which European settlers attacked a stronghold of the Tuscarora tribe called Fort Nooherooka.  Nearly a thousand Tuscarora Indians were captured or killed, forcing the remaining tribe members to migrate to New York. 

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