Naomi Prioleau

North Carolina Collection, UNC Chapel Hill / Wikimedia Commons

As many cities struggle to deal with their Confederate monuments, Greensboro has its own concrete legacy of white supremacy to contend with: Aycock Street was named after former governor and white supremacist Charles Aycock, whose name has already been removed from a Greensboro middle school and several other public buildings around the state.

Line of women stand in graduation gowns.
Naomi Prioleau / WUNC

Nearly 20 percent of residents in Greensboro live in poverty, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. A new series by WUNC reporter Naomi Prioleau examines the specific barriers these individuals face as they try to change their economic future.

Naomi Prioleau
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Burgeoning interest from foreign architects is sparking hope among High Point furniture manufacturers that they could find a new market overseas. A group of architects from India recently made their first visit to the area. And in Guilford County, one in 20 adults struggles with basic literacy tasks like reading a story or a map.