NAACP

When NC NAACP President William Barber sparred with state budget director Art Pope about the state’s political policies, it made headlines. The exchange spun off of a press conference where Barber announced plans to picket stores owned by Pope.

Photo: Rev. William Barber of the N.C. NAACP called for pickets outside Rose and Maxwell stores, which are owned by the family of state Budget Director Art Pope.
Jorge Valencia

The Rev. William Barber, who led weekly protests this year against laws passed by North Carolina’s Republican-controlled legislature, gathered with a few of his supporters Monday outside the state budget office to criticize a man they say supports policies that hurt poor people.

Dale Herman
Leoneda Inge

The people who were arrested at the Moral Monday protests at the state legislature will be recognized Thursday at the annual NAACP state convention.

More than 900 people were arrested during the Moral Monday protests against Republican policy in Raleigh.  One of them was Gann Herman.

“We are part of a growing coalition.  We come from a lot of different organizations and churches," said Gann Herman.

Her husband Dale Herman was also arrested.  He only demonstrated in anti-war demonstrations before this.

NAACP William Barber
Leoneda Inge

The state NAACP has started airing radio ads across North Carolina to educate voters on the new law.  The radio ad features the booming voice of Reverend William Barber – state NAACP president.

“Election day is one time we are all equal, whether you are young or old, rich or poor.  When we vote we all have the same say, that is unless you live in North Carolina," said Barber in this ad.

NC NAACP leader Reverend William Barber speaks to Moral Monday protesters.
Matthew Lenard

Several advocacy organizations have filed suit against the state of North Carolina after Governor Pat McCrory signed broad-based voting reform.  Earlier today, leaders with the NAACP spoke out against the law. Reverend William Barber said it unfairly targets African-American voters.

Rev. William Barber
North Carolina NAACP

Today is the first Monday in thirteen weeks without an NAACP led Moral Monday rally outside the Capitol in Raleigh. But the protests aren’t over. Rev. William Barber, leader of the North Carolina NAACP, says he’s taking Moral Monday on the road, all throughout the state. The road trip starts today in Asheville.

The coalition that Rev. Barber has built over the last few months is entering a new phase, and will be tested. Can it last? And can it win elections? 

Reverend William Barber addresses the Moral Mondays rally at the capitol, NAACP protest
Jessica Jones

151 people were arrested at the General Assembly Monday night. It was the fifth “Moral Monday” demonstration at the legislature, and it was the largest yet.

Police estimate that at least a thousand people crowded the mall behind the building to protest Republican policies on everything from education to tax cuts.  They started gathering on the Halifax Mall late yesterday afternoon.

A woman is arrested at the state capitol as a part of a Moral Mondays protest.
NAACP

If you've gone to the legislature these past four Mondays, you likely encountered a group of demonstrators singing, chanting, holding hands and raising signs. And a lot of them are getting arrested. Since April 29th, 153 people have been arrested at what the NAACP and other organizers are calling "Moral Mondays."

A group of community members and scholars joined host Frank Stasio on WUNC's The State of Things to talk about the recent arrests, as well as the theory and history behind civil disobedience on a global scale.

William Barber, NAACP
Jessica Jones

Police at the General Assembly in Raleigh arrested 17 protesters Monday evening who were protesting inside the building.

The group, which included state NAACP head Rev. William Barber, was speaking out against a series of Republican-led bills that have been passed recently. Barber says that includes a measure that would require residents to bring photo identification with them to the polls.

gordonmantler.com

The assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968 often overshadows what may be his most radical crusade. The Poor People’s Campaign in the spring of 1968 was organized by a coalition of predominately Black and Brown organizers working across the color line.

Pages