Muslim

Courtesy of the Hoke County Sheriff's Office

The Fort Bragg Army Reserve officer charged after a series of threatening incidents Thursday night at a mosque in Hoke County is a decorated veteran of two deployments to Iraq, said an Army spokesman.

Reema Khrais / WUNC

On February 10th, 2015, three young Muslim-Americans were murdered in their Chapel Hill apartment.

As kids, Razan Abu-Salha, 19, Yusor Abu-Salha, 21, and Deah Barakat, 23, attended Al-Iman Islamic School in Raleigh. In the video below, middle schoolers from Al-Iman react to their deaths and reflect on growing up in a climate that feels increasingly anti-Muslim. 

Photo: Suzanne Barakat
The Moth Radio Hour/ Ian Tervet

On the day of her youngest brother’s wedding, Suzanne Barakat combed his hair, held him and watched him dance in a ballroom with his new life partner.

She thought about how her 23-year-old brother, Deah, was no longer a lanky, basketball-obsessed teenager who struggled to focus on school. He had transformed into a well-rounded, ambitious student at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry and was marrying someone who shared his passion.

An image of Muslims feasting during Ramadan
Fiaz Fareed / Islamic Association of Raleigh

This week began Ramadan for Muslims across the world, but those in North Carolina were welcomed by a heat wave that went into triple-digit temperatures. During Ramadan, Muslims fast from sunrise to sundown for a month. That means no food or water, two things that people usually hold as sacred during the summer months.

But Aziza Shanab said no matter the temperature, Ramadan is a deeply spiritual time.

On The Media logo
NPR

Sunday's episode on February 22, 2015, of On The Media focused largely on issues surrounding the Chapel Hill shootings that left three young Muslims dead.

The show examined the divisive language of terrorism, reporting on media coverage and charges of double standards in that coverage, and at responses on social media.

You can listen to the whole program and selected excerpts below.

Malcolm X waiting for a press conference to begin on March 26, 1964.
U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress / Wikimedia Commons

The messages of civil rights leader Malcolm X still resonate 50 years after his assassination.

Conversations about Islam in America, police shootings and freedom of the press are as relevant in 2015 as they were on the day of his death: February 21, 1965.

Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill start a two-day conference to examine the legacy of Malcolm X today.

University of Georgia students and faculty standing in solidarity with the victims of the Chapel Hill shooting.
@athens4everyone / Twitter

In the days since the triple homicide of Chapel Hill residents Deah Barakat, Yusor Abu-Salha and Razan Abu-Salha, two hashtags have surged through social media feeds: #chapelhillshooting and #muslimlivesmatter.

Students Richard Phillips and Matthew Bunyi perform the song 'Stand By Me' prior to the call-to-prayer.
Megan Morr / Duke University Photography

Updated Friday 7:00 p.m.:

Hundreds of people stood on Duke University’s campus today in the shadow of a 210-foot Gothic chapel, listening to a wireless speaker that sat on the steps of the entrance.  

Had things gone differently this week the chant would’ve come from the top of the bell tower – not the bottom.

Graphic Illustration of "Allowed": A response to a 2013 Saudi law allowing women to ride bicycles only for leisure and only if accompanied by a male guardian.
Mohammed Sharaf

When Kuwaiti artist and graphic designer Mohammad Sharaf gets angry, he creates art.

Atlanta is considered the Black Gay Mecca of the United States.

Krista Bremer and her book, My Accidental Jihad
the author

My Accidental Jihad is a book Krista Bremer never imagined that she'd write. Krista is a surfer, she'd  grown up in a secular middle-class California family, dreaming of "a comfortable American life of adventure, romance, and opportunity."

Then she met Ismail. When Krista discovered she was pregnant, the two joined their lives. Ismail seemed to come from another world. He'd been raised in a fishing village in Libya, one of eight children. His parents are illiterate. His family was raised Muslim.

Melody Moezzi's 'Haldol and Hyacinths'
Avery Publishing

    

Melody Moezzi has always been outspoken. As an Iranian-American writer and attorney, she has devoted herself to discussing controversial issues like religion, politics and culture in Iran. But when she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, her family and doctors encouraged silence. On this issue, they thought, you could not speak the truth. Melody would not be quiet. She decided to write a memoir of her experiences so that others with the disorder, and those who know them, could better understand. The memoir is called “Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life,” (Avery/2013). Host Frank Stasio talks to her about her experience.

Kaaba
Turki Al-Fassam / flickr

About 26,000 Muslims live in North Carolina, a 30 percent increase during the past 10 years. At the same time, the post 9/11 fear of Islamic terrorism continues to dominate people's views of the Muslim religion and people in their community.

Adam Jones / flickr.com

Rarely do articles of clothing receive as much attention as the Muslim headscarf does in the 2000s. In quite a strange twist, the glances and questions that women who wear the headscarf, in non-Muslim majority societies receive is many times in contradiction with one of the purposes of the veil, which is to not draw attention to oneself.

Researchers at Duke University say the number of Muslim Americans convicted of terrorist acts in the U.S. is on a steady decline. They released the findings in conjunction with the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security.  In 2009, 49 people were arrested, and the number has dropped each subsequent year to 14 arrests last year. David Schanzer, director of the Triangle Center, says recent terrorism plotters haven’t been as sophisticated.

Muslim Community Reacts to Local Terrorism Trials

Jul 24, 2012

Raleigh's Muslim community is caught between two uncomfortably close to home criminal trials. The dust has finally settled around the case of the so-called Raleigh 7. The final member of that gang was convicted last month for conspiring to provide material support to terrorists and kill people overseas.  Now, lawyers are preparing for a related case that begins this November. It involves a highly respected Muslim woman from Raleigh.

Imam Speaks At UNC

Mar 16, 2011

UNC-Chapel Hill is hosting a lecture later today by Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf. He's the man at the heart of a controversial plan to build an Islamic Center near ground zero in lower Manhattan. Bill Balthrop is a professor in the department of communication studies at UNC. He says the Imam will talk about religious tolerance and pluralism in the United States during this year's Weil Lecture on American Citizenship:

The Islamic Center of Raleigh will host its annual open house for the public tomorrow. The event usually draws hundreds of people from the region who come to learn more about Muslims and their religion.

Imran Aukhil is a spokesman for the Islamic Association of Raleigh:

A candlelight vigil and prayer for the people of Egypt will be held this evening in Raleigh. The Muslim American Public Affairs Council and several others groups are organizing the vigil. Moe El-Gamal is the chairman of the council and one of the leading organizers. He also led a demonstration at the legislative building earlier today.