The Cover of The Love Language's newest album, Ruby Red.
Tim Lytvinenko /

They will be playing tonight at 9 p.m. at Cat's Cradle for their record release party.

Stuart McLamb, Jordan McLamb, Thomas Simpson, Eddie Sanchez, Andy Holmes and Autumn Ehinger join Frank Stasio in the studio today to discuss Ruby Red and The Love Language's upcoming performance.

Faye Hunter was the bassist for 80's band Let's Active.
Faye Hunter, Facebook

The Winston-Salem community mourns the loss of local musician Faye Hunter, who was found dead in on Saturday of an apparent suicide. She was 59 years old. Hunter was the bassist in the 80’s band Let’s Active, which was led by Mitch Easter. Yesterday on "Here & Now," host Jeremy Hobson interviewed Easter about his former bandmate.

Three backup singers stand behind the mic.

When you find yourself singing along to your favorite rock'n'roll songs, you're probably not singing along with a front man like David Bowie or Bruce Springsteen. You're probably singing along with their backup singers.

Phive is a band based in Greensboro.
Phive, Facebook

Greensboro band Phive has released a new single dedicated to Nelson Mandela. They made the announcement yesterday on Mandela Day, the birthday of the South African leader. Phive spoke with PRI's the World from WUNC's studios in Durham. You can listen to the interview here.

Here's the music video of their new song, "Madiba."

The band Many Nights Ahead performs on The State of Things.

Out of the Shenandoah Valley, Many Nights Ahead is a young 7-member bluegrass band looking to grow. Their music is influenced by the Shenandoah Valley and their backgrounds in genres such as blues and metal. 

Alice Gerrard is a staple of the Triangle music scene.
Irene Young

Alice Gerrard is a legend in the world of bluegrass, inspiring many musical greats, including The Judds. But it’s only on her latest production, “Bittersweet,” that she is releasing an entire album of all-original songs for the first time. Host Frank Stasio talks to Alice Gerrard in the studio, and she plays live.

Ain’t In It For My Health: A Film About Levon Helm screens at the Chelsea Theater.
Kino Lorber

Levon Helm is best known for being the drummer in the music group, “The Band,” but he had a long career after they broke up. He even fought his way back into musical shape after quitting for a time due to throat cancer. He finally succumbed in 2012, but not before filmmaker Jacob Hatley had a chance to film a documentary, “Ain’t In It For My Health: A Film About Levon Helm.”

Its Triangle premiere is at the Chelsea Theater in Chapel Hill on June 28.

An image of the Sombrero galaxy, created from composite photos of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team.

The full sound of symphony orchestras is a familiar accompaniment to science fiction spectacles like Star Trek and Star Wars. The North Carolina Symphony is celebrating the music of sci-fi in its Sci-Fi Spectacular tonight and tomorrow.  The concert is hosted by George Takei, “Mr. Sulu” of Star Trek fame.

Bring Me Back is a new book by Karen Booth.

Karen Booth spent years as an insider in the music industry before leaving behind the glitz. Her love for Duran Duran and other ‘80s groups spurred her to pursue her musical career. She draws upon her love and experience for her new novel “Bring Me Back” (Turquoise Morning Press/2013). Host Frank Stasio talks to her in the studio.

Town Mountain
Jason Beverly /

Last year, Town Mountain released their album Leave the Bottle.  On WNCW’s “Top 100 of 2012” list, the  Asheville-based bluegrass band's album earned the #19 spot. 

Town Mountain is playing tonight in Raleigh at The Pour House Music Hall.  The band joins Frank Stasio today in the studio to tell us about themselves and play a few songs.

Listen to their song "Come Break My Heart."

Ricky Skaggs recently spoke with WUNC's Eric Hodge about his new album, 'Music to My Ears.'
Rex Hammock / Flickr Creative Commons

Ricky Skaggs is a musical icon in the state of North Carolina.  He's won multiple Grammys in country music and bluegrass.  He began his career with a TV appearance as a seven-year-old playing with Flatt and Scruggs.  He moved onto Ralph Stanley's band as a teenager before working with Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton and many others.  He's widely considered to be one of the finest singers and players ever to pick up a banjo, mandolin, fiddle and guitar.

Hannah Shaw

Mount Moriah fans are familiar with Heather McIntyre’s heart-wrenching vocals.  But they may not be familiar with her work with the summer camp Girls Rock NC.  In fact, several fan favorites of the Triangle music scene support Girls Rock, including singer-songwriter Laura Thurston and Maria Albani of Schooner.

Cover of Jeanne Jolly's album 'Angels'.
Celeste Young / Family Love Photography

Jeanne Jolly visited our studio a year ago in the early stages of working on her album, “Angels.” Now, she is back in the midst of a national tour promoting her album.

Cover of the 80th Anniversary Issue of Our State Magazine
Our State North Carolina

Our State magazine has been telling the stories of North Carolina since 1933. It’s celebrating its 80th anniversary this year with a party at the Museum of History in Raleigh tomorrow.

Ballad singer and banj player Sheila Kay Adams.
Kim Dryden, courtesty of Sheila Kay Adams

Mention the name Sheila Kay Adams to any traditional old time musician and you’re likely to elicit a reverent response.  In the world of American ballad singers, Adams remains one of the pillars of tradition, drawing on her Madison County roots to perform and teach the old style of singing and banjo playing passed down in her family for generations.  This week, her lifetime of nurturing and sharing traditional music earned her a National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Ndabarushimana Christopher is a musician and refugee from Burundi who now calls Greensboro his home.
Ndabarushimana Christopher

Now in its fourth year, the Mosaic Festival celebrates the diversity and cultures of the Triad, attracting thousands of attendees. Host Frank Stasio talks with Sarah Ivory, director of the Immigration and Refugee Program of Church World Service of Greensboro, which organizes the festival. Plus, the band Wareware featuring Ndabarushimana Christopher, a Greensboro musician and refugee from Burundi, performs live at Triad Stage.

100 Men in Black Male Chorus

Wednesday, June 5th, the Hayti Heritage Center in Durham is hosting a celebration of spirituals with acclaimed author Ashley Bryan and the 100 Men in Black Male Chorus.

Woody Guthrie's relationship with his home state has always been complicated. The singer-songwriter left Oklahoma and traveled the nation, composing some of the best-known songs of his time and ours. But to many in the state, his progressive political views did not fit with a strong conservative streak during the Cold War period. His reputation there is now closer to a full restoration as Oklahoma opens his archives.

Hope Marasco

Hope talks about her efforts with host Frank Stasio, and performs some of her original songs, along with Mary Johnson Rockers and Will Ridenour.

Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle singing the ballad 'Lord Bateman' with a 'crankie.'
Laura Candler

When traditional Appalachian musician Anna Roberts-Gevalt first showed ballad singer Elizabeth LaPrelle a crankie, Elizabeth was speechless.

“I really freaked out,” LaPrelle said. She was astounded not only because she had never seen one before, but also because it was such a powerful tool for storytelling.

A child playing a street piano in New York.
Ed Yourdon via Flickr, Creative Commons

All the world’s a stage. Or, at least Downtown Raleigh will be for the next two weeks, as six pianos have been placed there outdoors for anyone to play.  The decorated instruments are set up in public locations around the city as a part of Artsplosure, Raleigh’s annual visual and performing arts festival, and passersby of any skill level are encouraged to give them a go.

The album cover for Boomer's Story by Ry Cooder.

A performer at last year's Oak City 7 concert series in Raleigh.
Carter Peery, courtesy of OC7.

Summer is fast approaching, and so is outdoor concert season. If you’re aching to spend warm nights in the company of friends listening to good music under the stars, you’re in luck. The options for outdoor music in the Triad are numerous. Several small towns host regular, free concerts and larger cities like Raleigh, Durham, and Greensboro have multiple outdoor music series showcasing  everything from chamber music to R & B, and from hip hop to bluegrass.

Diali Cissokho, a Senegalese musician, moved to the United States several years ago hoping to meet like-minded musicians. He formed the band Kaira Ba with four North Carolina natives.

David Holt took this photo of Doc Watson's final Merlefest performance in 2012. Watson died a month later.
David Holt

If you’re searching for the who’s who among bluegrass, Americana, folk, and traditional country musicians, MerleFest is a good place to start. The annual four-day festival kicks off today in Wilkesboro, just as it has every April for the past 25 years. Headlining artists include The Avett Brothers, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Rhonda Vincent & The Rage, Jerry Douglas, Steep Canyon Rangers, Matraca Berg, and others. But this year for the first time, the festival will lack a performance from its founder, Doc Watson, who died May 29, 2012.