Music

Arts & Culture
2:35 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Nothing Could Be Finer Than To Be In Carolina - But Which One?

Gus Kahn wrote the lyrics for 'Carolina in the Morning' in 1922.
Credit Johns Hopkins University, The Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music

Andy Marx talks about how a Carolina governor tried to claim his grandfather's song 'Carolina In the Morning' as the state's own, and Sean Cole remembers Daffy Duck's version of the tune.

If you’ve ever attended a public event or high school choir performance in North or South Carolina, chances are you’ve heard the song “Carolina in The Morning.” But which Carolina does the iconic tune refer to?

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The State of Things
11:42 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Musician Sings For Social Justice

Tokyo Rosenthal
Credit tokyorosenthal.com

Tokyo Rosenthal plays live on The State of Things

Tokyo Rosenthal is an Americana musician. And while Americana might be a traditional sort of music, Tokyo Rosenthal isn’t your traditional artist.

His sound combines rock, country and blues, and his songs revolve around issues of social justice. Host Frank Stasio talks to him about his newest album, and Tokyo Rosenthal plays live in the studio.

The State of Things
12:05 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Exploring The History Of The Steel Guitar

Ad: The Royal Hawaiian Quintet Performing on the U.S. Mainland
Credit University of Hawaii at Manoa Library, via flickr, creative commons

Experts from the Steel Guitar Concert and Symposium talk about the history of the steel guitar and play live

  

The sound of American Country music owes much of it's success to an unlikely source: the 19th century Hawaiian music scene. Hawaiian music at that time was dominated by the steel guitar. During the instrument's century-long international migration, it influenced the direction of many genres.

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This Is NPR
9:30 am
Sun March 17, 2013

'The Thistle & Shamrock' Host ProFile, Straight From The Scottish Highlands

ⓒRoy Summers/Scottish Field

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:56 pm

We're celebrating St. Patrick's Day in true public radio form - a conversation with the award-winning host of NPR's The Thistle & Shamrock. Fiona Ritchie has spent more than 30 years digging into the evolving Celtic music tradition, bringing public radio listeners well-established and newly emerging recording artists in Europe and North America.Today, we got her to dish on the Irish, her children and NPR, too.

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The State of Things
11:23 am
Fri March 15, 2013

The Gravy Boys Ladle Americana On Thick

The Gravy Boys at The Pourhouse
Credit gravyboys.com / Christer Berg Photography

The Gravy Boys join host Frank Stasio for a spirited conversation and live performance

The Americana music of The Gravy Boys hit the scene about eight years ago. They’re now three albums in and expanding their acoustic sound. Their newest album is called Crackerjack Whistle, and they’ll be playing in Raleigh tomorrow night.

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Tiny Desk Concerts
2:03 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill: Tiny Desk Concert

Martin Hayes and Dennis Cahill perform a Tiny Desk Concert on Feb. 25, 2013.
Gabriella Demczuk NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 6:37 pm

You're about to watch one of the best fiddlers on the planet and a subtle guitar master work their magic. For too many of us, Irish music is something that merely gets trotted out around this time of year, associated with St. Patrick's Day and the coming of spring — and made a cliche by commercialism and whatever other shallow notions make cliches what they are.

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Arts & Culture
3:30 pm
Fri March 1, 2013

Appalachian Music With Old Fashioned Stage Effects

Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle
Credit annaandelizabeth.com

While many popular musicians today seek out the newest digital technology to enhance their performances, there’s a young musical duo from rural Virginia who are moving in the opposite direction. Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle call themselves simply “Anna and Elizabeth.”  Both accomplished traditional Appalachian musicians on a variety of instruments, together they have resurrected a storytelling tradition called the “crankie,” whose technology outdates their combined age (which is 50).

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The State of Things
11:56 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Neoclassical Metal Turns Symphony Upside Down

Darker Shades of Symphony
Credit darkershadesofsymphony.com

Darker Shades of Symphony perform live

Front man Michael Seebold describes his band, Darker Shades of Symphony, as neoclassical metal. If you’ve never heard of that genre, you’re probably not alone.

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The State of Things
12:20 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

Overmountain Men Blend History, Appalachian Music

'The Next Best Thing' is the second CD by Overmountain Men
Credit Overmountain Men

Music and conversation with David Childers from Overmountain Men

Musicians David Childers and Bob Crawford bonded over a shared love of Appalachian music and history. The result is the second CD from their band "The Overmountain Men." Crawford is also the bassist for the Avett Brothers, while Childers has had a long career with the Modern Don Juans.

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The State of Things
12:11 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Celebrating The Man Who Recorded The World

Alan Lomax with James (Son) Thomas, Delta Blues Festival, Greenville, Mississippi, 1979. Photo by Bill Ferris.
Credit culturalequity.org

Bill Ferris and Nathan Salsburg join Isaac-Davy Aronson to discuss the legacy of Alan Lomax

Alan Lomax dedicated seven decades of his life to recording and distributing the sound of as much of the globe as he could reach. Beginning as a 17-year-old from Austin, Texas, Alan traveled with his father, John Lomax, to plantations, farms and prisons in the deep South.

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