Movies On The Radio

Credit Keith Weston / WUNC

"Movies on the Radio" is a series of  conversations about the silver screen from The State of Things. Listeners provide feedback about their favorites and least favorites. Then, Frank Stasio and guests take an in-depth look at what moves us at the movies.  

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

From Citizen Kane to All The President's Men, the world of journalism has provided subject matter for the silver screen for decades.

Some plot lines resonate with viewers for their basis in real-life facts.  Others are popular for their dramatization of the newsroom or television studio.

The State of Things wants to hear from you. What is your favorite journalism-related movie and why? Did Spotlight deserve the Oscar for Best Picture? Is All The President's Men the gold standard? Is Anchorman one of the all-time greats?

An image of Socars statues
Prayltno / Flickr Creative Commons

The Academy Awards are a time to celebrate the year's best in film, from the best in directing to costume design. But as movie stars like Leonardo DiCaprio and Cate Blanchett cross their fingers for a golden statue this year, many movies from 2015 remain overlooked by the Academy.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

The Oscars are coming up on February 28. Leading the nominees this year is The Revenant starring Leonardo DiCaprio in a riveting performance as a fur trapper in the 1820s. Meanwhile, Cate Blanchett received her seventh nomination for her role in Carol.

And some  actors and movie-goers alike claim this year's Academy Awards nominations lack diversity with no actors of color receiving nominations. 

This month's edition of 'Movies on the Radio' looks at movies about food or movies with food scenes.
Eric McGregor / Flickr Creative Commons

Chefs are fond of saying "we eat with our eyes," but that phrase takes on a whole new meaning when it comes to movies about food.

Films like the classic "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" or Stanley Tucci's "Big Night" have had stomachs rumbling for decades. But more recent movies like the animated "Ratatouille" or Jon Favreau's "Chef" have also been material for aspiring chefs and foodies. 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next "Movies on the Radio" show, The State of Things wants to know about your favorite movie in which food is one of the leading characters.

From Stanley Tucci's "Big Night" to the animated "Ratatouille" or the classic "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," these are movies that make your stomach rumble.

Send an email to sot@wunc.org with your favorite food movie, and you could be a part of our next Movies on the Radio program.

'Toy Story 3' was one listener's pick for a 'feel-good movie' for this month's edition of Movies on the Radio.
Alan / Falcon / Flickr Creative Commons

People watch movies to laugh, to cry and sometimes to just feel good.

Romance, hope and happiness are common themes in children's movies like "Toy Story 3" and romantic comedies like "You've Got Mail."

Host Frank Stasio talks with Marsha Gordon, film studies professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about Hollywood's feel-good flicks.

Check out some of the movies featured in the program below:

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

It is the movie you turn to when you need some uplifting. It is a film you relax to on the couch during a cozy Sunday afternoon.

For the next Movies on the Radio, we want to know your favorite "feel-good" movie. What is the flick you go to when you feel in need of some heartfelt happy tears? Did you fall in love with the family in Little Miss Sunshine? Or do you cry every time Nemo is reunited with his dad in Finding Nemo? Let us know in the form below or email sot@wunc.org with your response!

Orson Welles directed, produced, co-authored, and starred in 'Citizen Kane,' considered by many as the greatest film ever made.
Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

The 1941 film Citizen Kane is considered by many to be one of the best films of all time. Its daring subject matter, bold visuals, and unique style made Orson Welles a household name.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

December marks the two-year anniversary of The State of Things monthly Movies On The Radio series. Each month, Host Frank Stasio and film experts Laura Boyes and Marsha Gordon select a category and listeners submit their film picks. The tables are turning. We want to hear from you - what topic would you like to hear on Movies On The Radio? Send an email to sot@wunc.org and put "Movies" in the subject line. 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

When Dustin Hoffman auditioned for the role of Benjamin Braddock in “The Graduate,” he did not imagine he would become a Hollywood star.

The theater actor was certain he bombed the screen test, so imagine his surprise when he landed the role that would catapult his career to unprecedented stardom. “The Graduate” became an instant classic. 

This month's Movies on the Radio is a live event at the Hunt Library at North Carolina State University.  The State of Things host Frank Stasio will join Marsha Gordon of NC State University's Film Studies department and

Movies On The Radio: Alfred Hitchcock

Aug 26, 2015
Alfred Hitchcock
Insomnia Cured Here / Flickr Creative Commons

Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most celebrated and prolific filmmakers in cinema.

He directed more than 50 films in six decades, mastered the art of psychological thrillers and suspense, and meticulously crafted scenes filled with compelling visuals. 

What's Your Favorite Hitchcock Movie?

Jul 10, 2015
Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Ask most cinephiles about the greatest movie directors and producers ever, and Alfred Hitchcock's name will  come up. 

Hitchcock was the "Master of Suspense," unlocking the suspenseful storytelling method for the screen. He toyed with camera movement and shot framing. He is simply one of the most influential cinematographers of all-time. 

Image of Sandra Bullock accepting a Golden Raspberry award in 2010 for worst actress.
Shari B. Ellis / Flickr Creative Commons

A "bad" movie can ruin a night out, or it can secretly be your favorite source of entertainment for a night in.

We all have movies that we would rather not admit we enjoy, but sometimes we cannot stop ourselves from loving corny one-liners or ridiculous action scenes.

They are on the shelf marked "Guilty Pleasures." 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Sometimes you watch a movie and realize that it is just, well...bad. Maybe the acting is subpar or the film lacks a cohesive plot. But sometimes you watch these so-called bad movies and realize you actually like them. Despite the puns, cheesy sound effects or box office flop, you like the movie but don't want everyone knowing how much you like it. Some of these movies probably deserve Golden Razzy consideration. 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

  Science fiction is a genre made for the movies. The narratives make viewers question reality, think about space exploration and ponder human existence. Sci-fi films have produced some of the most financially successful films in movie history.

The Matrix
Wikipedia

The science fiction genre contains some of the most successful movies in cinema history. Avatar grossed more than $2.7 billion, making it the single highest-grossing film of all time. The Star Wars series, which releases its 7th title later this year, is the 5th highest-grossing film series. The Transformers series also crack the top 10 highest-grossing series. 

Airplane!
Wikipedia

From silent film to slapstick comedy, humor has been a staple of the silver screen since the dawn of modern cinema. Listeners share their favorite funny scenes from a wide range of movies from “Young Frankenstein” to “Airplane." Host Frank Stasio talks with North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes and North Carolina State University film professor Marsha Gordon about the funniest moments in film.

Jim Carrey
Wikipedia

For the next edition of the "Movies On The Radio" series The State of Things wants to know which movie scenes crack you up. We don't mean scenes that just made you chuckle – we mean knee-slapping, doubled-over, abs-hurt-the-next-day laughter. 

Is it the takeoff scene from Airplane!?

The ribs scene from I'm Gonna Git You Sucka?

Ferris Bueller's Day Off
Wikipedia

The film Boyhood was a box office hit this year. Director Richard Linklater and his team shot the film over 12 years, a feat that impressed moviegoers and critics alike. Boyhood was nominated for six Academy Awards, and Patricia Arquette, who plays the mother, took best supporting actress.

But even though the film is novel in its lengthy production, at Boyhood's core is a story told time and again throughout the history of cinema: adolescence. 

Movies On The Radio: A Kiss

Feb 11, 2015

    

A kiss is just a kiss. Or is it? 

One of the most iconic on screen lip locks was the tearful and delicate embrace on Casablanca. On today's Movies on the Radio show, listeners share their favorite silver screen kisses.  

Oscars
Prayitno / Flickr Creative Commons

 

The Oscar nominations were announced earlier today with Birdman and The Grand Budapest Hotel topping the list with nine nominations each.  As the stars prepare to hit the red carpet, listeners take a look back at the best and worst films of 2014.

From Boyhood to Interstellar, Host Frank Stasio talks with North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes and North Carolina State University film professor Marsha Gordon.

Gone Girl Premiere at the 52nd New York Film Festival, October 2014
aphrodite-in-nyc Wikimedia

From Boyhood To Gone Girl, 2014 had many blockbuster movies. What is your favorite and why? Answer the survey and leave your contact information if you are interested in the possibility of being on the show.

It's A Wonderful Life
wikipedia

Note: This program is a rebroadcast from December 23, 2013.  

From Elf to Home Alone and Love Actually to A Christmas Story, the tradition of a holiday film is as vital to some people as singing carols or decorating a tree. Host Frank Stasio talks with Marsha Gordon, professor of film studies at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art.

 

The original poster for Dirty Dancing, which was filmed in North Carolina.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dirty-dancing.jpg

From The Last of the Mohicans to Dirty Dancing and Days of Thunder, movies made in North Carolina have gone on to great box office success. 

Cold Mountain, NC
Wikipedia

In this month's episode of the Movies on the Radio series, The State of Things takes a look at North Carolina movies. What is your favorite and why? Answer the survey and leave your contact information if you are interested in the possibility of being on the show.

The Big Combo (1955)
Wikipedia

  

Smoke-filled rooms, femmes fatales and twisting crime plots are markers of a period in cinematography known as film noir.

Two silhouetted figures in the 1955 film The Big Combo
Wikipedia

  The highly stylized crime dramas of the 1940's marked a very specific space in cinematic history: film noir. The genre is called "one of Hollywood’s only organic artistic movements" by the Film Noir Foundation

Meet Me In St. Louis
Wikipedia

Since the transition from silent films in the 1920s, the musical has been a staple of the movie industry. Some of the cinema’s biggest hits include song and dance.  From Singing in the Rain to Grease, host Frank Stasio looks at musicals at the movies with North Carolina University film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes.

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