Movies

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next episode of "Movies on the Radio," The State of Things is asking, what is your favorite movie about politics? 

Do you like the classics, such as “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” or "The Manchurian Candidate?"  Did you enjoy Julianne Moore’s performance as Sarah Palin in “Game Change” or were you charmed by Kevin Kline in the rom-com "Dave?"   Film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes will examine how movies depict politicians and government and discuss memorable scenes from political movies through the ages.

Screenshot from Zootopia
BagoGames / Flickr

From Jungle Book to Jaws and Babe to The Lion King, the stars of the silver screen are often not humans but instead are our four-legged friends. Though no animal has ever won an Oscar, viewers have embraced animal actors and characters in film.

photo from "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Moni3 [Public Domain] / Wikimedia Commons

Most movies are sources of adventure and excitement, but some films can also be a source of temptation. Whether a movie was off-limits by your parents or banned by the church, a forbidden film can often be all the more enticing to watch. Maybe your parents thought the dinosaur eating a man off the toilet in "Jurassic Park" was too violent, or that "To Kill a Mockingbird" talked about taboo topics.

Image of two best friends
Flickr/ Stuart Seeger

Best friends are the constant in many people's lives. They rescue each other when a car breaks down. They join go on late-night quests for fast food. And they console and support each other in a time of need. The relationships of best friends have been fodder for movie plot lines for decades and exist in all genres.

This month's edition of 'Movies on the Radio' looks at movies about food or movies with food scenes.
Eric McGregor / Flickr Creative Commons

Chefs are fond of saying "we eat with our eyes," but that phrase takes on a whole new meaning when it comes to movies about food.

Films like the classic "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" or Stanley Tucci's "Big Night" have had stomachs rumbling for decades. But more recent movies like the animated "Ratatouille" or Jon Favreau's "Chef" have also been material for aspiring chefs and foodies. 

Paul Smith

Peyton Reed fell in love with movies after watching the original “Planet of the Apes” as a child. He grew up in Raleigh and dedicated his teen years to film production.

He studied film at UNC-Chapel Hill and soon moved to Los Angeles to jump start his career. But it took Reed years to work his way into the directing ranks.

Image of Sandra Bullock accepting a Golden Raspberry award in 2010 for worst actress.
Shari B. Ellis / Flickr Creative Commons

A "bad" movie can ruin a night out, or it can secretly be your favorite source of entertainment for a night in.

We all have movies that we would rather not admit we enjoy, but sometimes we cannot stop ourselves from loving corny one-liners or ridiculous action scenes.

They are on the shelf marked "Guilty Pleasures." 

Bastard Film Encounter

Apr 22, 2015
Bastard Film Encounter 2015
Bastard Film Encounter

  Romantic comedy, horror, and documentary are all genres of films found on Netflix that provide neat boxes for categorization. But what about the films that don’t fit squarely into a category? 

Host Frank Stasio talks with Skip Elsheimer, co-organizer of the Bastard Film Encounter which brings archivists and film enthusiasts together to discuss forgotten, misplaced and awkward films.

Logo for the RiverRun International Film Festival
riverrunfilm.com

The 17th annual RiverRun International Film Festival returns to Winston-Salem this month. 

Casablanca Kiss
Wikipedia

There can be no doubt Hollywood loves the kiss. New York Times film critic A.O. Scott examines the history of lip-locking on the silver screen in his recent piece, A Brief History of Kissing in The Movies.

Varsity Theatre marquis
The Varsity Theatre

Update Monday 11:44 a.m.:

The Varsity Theatre has successfully made their goal to buy a new digital projector, and they still have 26 days to go in their Kickstarter campaign #GoDigitalOrGoDark. The building houses two theaters, but to try to keep the goal attainable, organizers asked for enough money to convert one to digital. Any additional funds raised in the final days of the campaign will go toward updating the second, larger theater.

A new movie set in Western North Carolina opens in select theaters this weekend. The World Made Straight is based on a novel by North Carolina native Ron Rash.  It follows a legacy of violence dating back to the Civil War. 

The main character, Travis Shelton, is seventeen when he discovers a grove of marijuana in the woods ... and then he steps into the jaws of a bear trap. Injured, he is discovered by the pot farmer who set the trap, Carlton Toomey.

Langston Hughes
Wikipedia

This show is a rebroadcast from December 23, 2013 

  Originally a play by poet Langston Hughes, Black Nativity made its contemporary debut on the big screen. The film follows a teenager who travels to Harlem to spend the holidays with his estranged relatives.  Executive producer Joy Goodwin is a professor of creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Goodwin about Black Nativity

The original poster for Dirty Dancing, which was filmed in North Carolina.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dirty-dancing.jpg

From The Last of the Mohicans to Dirty Dancing and Days of Thunder, movies made in North Carolina have gone on to great box office success. 

Meet Me In St. Louis
Wikipedia

Since the transition from silent films in the 1920s, the musical has been a staple of the movie industry. Some of the cinema’s biggest hits include song and dance.  From Singing in the Rain to Grease, host Frank Stasio looks at musicals at the movies with North Carolina University film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes.

Image of Superman
Flickr/Nicholas Rumas

When you were a child, did you imagine being Superman? 

Wikimedia

Note: This is a rebroadcast of a show from Tuesday, March 18, 2014.

For many, The Wizard of Oz is a happy tale of Dorothy and her little dog Toto skipping along the yellow brick road.

But for some, the Wicked Witch and the flying monkeys were the visions of nightmares.

The von Trapps in front of mountain backdrop
Courtesy of the North Carolina Symphony

Sofia, Melanie, Amanda and August von Trapp are the grandchildren of Werner von Trapp. He was portrayed as Kurt in the beloved film, "The Sound of Music." The young von Trapps learned to sing from their grandfather and have been touring together for 13 years. The foursome sang "Edelweiss" on The State of Things.

Yankee Doodle Dandy
Via Flickr Cliff1066

  

Tomorrow, across the nation, Americans will celebrate our independence with parades, barbeques and fireworks. Some will celebrate the holiday with an annual viewing of their favorite patriotic film.

Promotional trailers: Homeland, Ironman 3, Hunger Games
Showtime, Marvel Studios, Lionsgate

North Carolina could see fewer hits like Iron Man 3 or Homeland filmed in the state. That’s because tax incentives that encourage the film industry to make movies here are set to expire in January. Some lawmakers are trying to pass a measure that would give grants to the film industry to keep production companies here. But while budget negotiations are underway, time is running out to pass legislation.

Poster
Wikipedia

What movie captures that patriotic feeling? Is it the President's speech in the 1996 hit Independence Day? Or the wholesome enthusiasm of Mr. Smith on his adventure to Washington?

As the 4th of July approaches, The State of Things movie experts Laura Boyes and Marsha Gordon look at patriotism on the big screen.

The Great Gatsby movie set
Wikimedia

  The Hunger Games. Harry Potter. The Great Gatsby. Blockbuster films or popular literature? Do you ever walk out of the movie theater and hear, "The book was so much better than the movie."? Or do you prefer the silver screen adaptation of your favorite novel? Turning a book into a movie poses all sorts of challenges.

Wikipedia

"The book was so much better than the movie." It is a refrain we have all heard. But sometimes the film version exceeds the expectations of the written tale.

Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, return to The State of Things to talk with host Frank Stasio about literary adaptations in film.

Wikimedia

  

For many, The Wizard of Oz is a happy tale of Dorothy and her little dog Toto skipping along the yellow brick road. But for some, the Wicked Witch and the flying monkeys were the visions of nightmares.

Host Frank Stasio talks with North Carolina State University film professor Marsha Gordon and North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes about the movies that traumatized you as a child.

Wikipedia

Love can be strange, complicated and even downright bizarre. The portrayals of romance on the silver screen are no exception. Just in time for Valentine's Day, Host Frank Stasio talks with Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about unconventional romance in the movies. 

Here are some of their picks and your favorites:

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