Mississippi

Bill Ferris has been a leading documentarian of southern culture for more than five decades. His work has preserved the work of blues musicians, painters, writers and many more.
Marcie Cohen Ferris

Note: This program is a rebroadcast from Monday, December 7. 

When Bill Ferris meets someone, he usually asks, “Where are you from?”

The simple question prompts an important answer for the folklorist. For Ferris, a sense of place is integral to one's identity, and there is hardly a more influential and complex place in shaping identities than the American South. 

An image of Crystal Sanders
Crystal Sanders

In 1965, a Head Start program called the Child Development Group of Mississippi offered an alternative education for children in low-income communities. It also gave working-class black Mississippians a chance to secure jobs outside of the local white power structure.

A photo from Grenada, Miss., where Nan Elizabeth Woodruff studies the legacies of terror and violence against people of color.
Matthew Nichols / Flickr Creative Commons

  This year marks the 50th anniversary of many monumental moments of the civil rights movement.

And a group of scholars and activists gather today at the National Humanities Center to push for increased dialogue about how the historical violence against people of color continues to resonate today.