Mexican-American

a photo of the Mexican flag
Ivan Hernández / flickr, Creative Commons

The Mexican Consulate in Raleigh has seen an influx of first-generation U.S. citizens pursuing dual citizenship.

Immigrants’ rights vigil in Marshall Park, Charlotte, May 1, 2006.
Rosario Machicao / La Noticia, Charlotte

Waves of Mexican immigration to the United States date back to the turn of the 20th century. At the start of the Mexican Revolution, groups of Mexicans moved to the U.S. They quickly became an important part of the blue-collar work force. Though some communities welcomed them, others did not.

Javier Diaz de Leon
Consulado General de Mexico en Raleigh

    

Nearly 30 percent of immigrants in the United States are from Mexico, but migration between the two countries is changing. A study from the Pew Research Center indicates this country is at the tail end of the largest wave of immigration in American history.

And in North Carolina, more families are permanently relocating here rather than traveling for temporary work.

North Carolina Museum of Art

Mexican-American and Latino printmaking has strong roots in political activism. In the sixties, printmaking was used primarily to make posters, graphics and cartoons that would convey political messages and assist with community organizing.