Lawmakers are still at odds over how to close a projected 139 million dollar shortfall in the state's Medicaid budget. Governor Bev Perdue has accused Republican leaders in the General Assembly of breaking their promise to help close a spending gap. Democratic Representative Verla Insko says legislators must decide how to come up with the money.

A health-provider system that has worked well for Medicaid recipients will soon be available for state employees and big business.  It’s called “First in Health.” 

“First in Health” is born out of a Medicaid program that supports a team approach to health care.  It’s where you have specialists, primary care physicians, pharmacists and others coordinating services.  Doctor Allen Dobson is president of Community Care of North Carolina.  He says private employers are now saying – this can work for us.

State officials, physicians, patient advocates and Medicaid recipients attended a public forum earlier today about big changes to one of the state's largest entitlement programs. In June, lawmakers at the General Assembly directed state health officials to cut more than 350 million dollars from Medicaid spending. Jessica Jones reports officials hope forums like this will help them decide where to cut costs.

State officials, healthcare providers, and patient advocates will gather at N-C State today for a public forum on cuts to the state's Medicaid program.

The state budget passed in June requires the Department of Health and Human Services to cut 354 million dollars from its Medicaid budget. It's one of the largest reductions to health programs in state history, according to the head of the department, Secretary Lanier Cansler. He says it's going to require a group effort to decide exactly what to cut.

New data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services shows some higher complication rates than average at several area hospitals.

The new online data base at the Medicare website shows rates for eight so-called 'never' events.  Those are complications Medicare officials believe should never happen in hospitals. Those incidents include patients developing bedsores, or doctors leaving objects inside their surgical patients. Medicare has stopped reimbursing hospitals for many of these hospital acquired complications.