Media

Geoff Livingston / Flickr Creative Commons

Whether the result of uninformed reporting or newsrooms lacking in diversity, the media’s depiction of Muslims can be simplistic and inaccurate.

It sometimes presents Muslims as violent, extreme, and monolithic, creating a culture of fear and blame that victimizes them.

Roger H. Goun / Flickr Creative Commons

President Trump has openly shared his animosity towards the media, calling journalists “among the most dishonest human beings on Earth.” New White House press secretary Sean Spicer’s first remarks to the media from the press briefing room amounted to a lecture against what he called “deliberately false reporting.”

Photo of Yasmin Evans and her mother
Yasmin Evans

As a young Muslim-American journalist, Yasmin Bendaas pays particular attention to how Muslim women are represented in the media.

As international media coverage continues to put a spotlight on the Islamic State Group and American political rhetoric highlights religious stereotypes, Bendaas began to wonder how these representations of Islam have impacted the daily lives of Muslim-American women.

Jorge Valencia / WUNC

It’s hard to imagine an industry in North Carolina that hasn’t somehow been affected by House Bill 2.  Restaurants say they’ve lost business. Hotels have seen conference organizers cancel conventions to protest the law. And start-ups say some investors are steering clear of North Carolina. But much of the work of dealing with the unwanted attention has been left to small businesses that don’t want to be associated with the law.

Serena Williams won the first three Grand Slams of the tennis season and is considered one of the top female tennis players ever but is often scrutinized for her demeanor.
Yann Caradec / Flickr Creative Commons

A new season of television launches this week with hit shows Empire and Black-ish. The shows are breaking records and barriers with audiences, showcasing narratives of black life in America. 

Meanwhile, Viola Davis won an Emmy this weekend for "Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series," becoming the first woman of color to win the award. 

University of South Carolina Press

In his 13 years at the Raleigh News and Observer, J. Peder Zane says he tried to perfect the art of the newspaper column. 

Zane came to North Carolina in 1996 to be the paper's book review editor after years as a reporter for the New York Times. His journalism experience informed the way he would tackle his own commentary: by connecting today's newsmakers to the complex characters in American literature.

Laura Wagner/ The Radio Haiti Archive

Radio Haiti was the first independent Haitian radio station and the first public media platform to broadcast largely in Creole. Under the leadership of journalists Jean Dominique and Michele Montas, the station spent decades covering the social, cultural and political stories often ignored by most other Haitian media. Radio Haiti was shut down by the government a number of times and was under constant government pressure while it was on the air.

On The Media logo
NPR

Sunday's episode on February 22, 2015, of On The Media focused largely on issues surrounding the Chapel Hill shootings that left three young Muslims dead.

The show examined the divisive language of terrorism, reporting on media coverage and charges of double standards in that coverage, and at responses on social media.

You can listen to the whole program and selected excerpts below.

Image of H.L. Mencken
Flickr/Union-Square

 

H.L. Mencken was a columnist, author and journalist regarded as one of the most influential American writers from the early 20th century.

  

Much of what we know about autism is publicly disputed, from the definition of autism itself to the reasons behind the increase in diagnoses.