Marine Life

Business & Economy
9:05 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Federal Cuts Could Close 115 Year Old Beaufort Marine Lab

A National Center for Coastal Ocean Science researcher looks into a beaker containing lionfish eggs. Scientists agree NOAA's Beaufort lab has been the site for valuable fisheries research for more than a century. If Congress passes President Barack Obama's budget proposal, the lab will close.
Credit NOAA

If Congress passes the president's proposed 2015 budget, North Carolina's coast could lose a century-old marine lab.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's lab in Beaufort is on the chopping block.

Ciaran Clayton is a spokeswoman for NOAA.

“The current cost per year to operate and maintain the facility (is) about $1.6 million per year,” Clayton said. “It's an aging facility and would require additional funding to make those improvements, something that is just not currently in our current budget or in our future budgets.”

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Science & Technology
2:00 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Duke Study Finds Blue Whales Are Affected By Military Sonar

Duke researcher Ari Friedlaender attaching a suction-cup tag to the back of a blue whale off the coast of southern California.
Credit Courtesy of Ari Friedlaender; NMFS Permit 14534

New research from Duke University looks at how whales are impacted by military sonar used in underwater training exercises.  The study was conducted off the coast of California and found that whales might avoid important feeding sites when exposed to mid-frequency sonar routinely produced at a nearby military training site.

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The State of Things
11:37 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Scientists And Musicians Collaborate To Explore The Underwater World Of Biomusic

A whale
Credit UNCG BioMusic

Music production is often considered a very “human” creation. But scientists have recently discovered the songs of mice, elephants, and other animals that human ears are unable to capture.  Scientists and musicians in Greensboro have been exploring the world of biomusic, music produced by nature, beneath the ocean surface.

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Environment
5:40 am
Thu April 28, 2011

Less Ice = More Krill = More Whales

Ari Friedlaender with Humpback whale in Wilhelmina Bay, Antarctica
Credit Alison Stimpert, University of Hawaii

  Duke scientists are finding record numbers of humpback whales feeding on krill on the Western Antarctic Peninsula. A new report shows scientists observed more than 300 whales in a bay in May 2009. Scientists say a sheet of ice should have prevented whales from feeding on krill by that time of year. But Duke’s Ari Friedlaender says climate change is shortening the winter season and ice is forming slowly. So the krill are exposed for feeding.

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