Low-Income Students

Fourth-grader Alexa has been taking lessons with Musical Empowerment volunteer Mai Riquier for the past three years. She says that without violin lessons, she’d be “so stressed out,” and that they make her “feel like [she] can do anything in the world.”
Lisa Philip / WUNC

On a recent evening in a second-floor room of the University United Methodist Church in Chapel Hill, Joshua Pongsitiphon tries out the final chords of a funeral march on a slightly out-of-tune piano. His teacher, Katharine Batchelor, sits next to him on the piano bench. She asks him how the new piece feels.

Students at Eno Valley Elementary School in Durham work on homework during a free afterschool program. It's entirely funded by a federal education grant that the Trump administration wants to scrap.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

The Trump administration wants to cut $1 billion in federal education funding for after-school programs. Many of these programs provide low-cost or free academic opportunities for low-income students.

White House officials say those programs have not been effective. But some local educators, parents -- and kids -- disagree.

An image of UNC's Old Well
yeungb / Wikipedia Creative Commons

Three North Carolina universities are deepening their commitment to equal access.

Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill and Davidson College have joined the new, 30-member American Talent Initiative. Participating institutions, both public and private, pledge to expand their outreach to low-income students.

GLOW students Trinity Moore and Deniya Evans reacted to a lip-syncing performance by their teachers.
Jess Clark / WUNC

At GLOW Academy, about 100 rising sixth graders were out to recess during a recent summer bridge camp. The motto on the back of their bright yellow T-shirts leaves no doubt that GLOW is focused on the long game.