Loretta Lynch

An image of a youth radio reporter and US Attorney General Loretta Lynch
Kamaya Truitt-Martin / WUNC

It’s not every day you get to see Loretta Lynch, the first black woman to be U.S. Attorney General. WUNC Youth Radio’s Kamaya Truitt-Martin and Taylor Walker almost didn’t get that chance.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch says fighting human trafficking is one of her priorities.
Jeff Tiberii

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch spoke about fighting human trafficking this morning in North Carolina. The nation's  top prosecutor described human trafficking as modern-day slavery during a visit to the Triangle on Wednesday.

"Whether it is sexual trafficking, whether it is forced labor, but it is quite frankly the 21st century scourge of our time- and it really has no place in modern society, it has no place in the country, it has no place in this state," said Lynch.

Lynch praised federal prosecutors based here for their efforts to stop trafficking.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

A controversial bill that would have outlawed any state action that might burden one's exercise of religion is dead in the North Carolina House. 

Republican leaders said they are dropping the Religious Freedom Act to focus on legislation to boost the economy and create jobs.

House lawmakers also voted yesterday to extend the waiting period for abortions from one day to three. 

Governor Pat McCrory unveiled his budget plan yesterday.

Education tops the governor's priority list but critics say it doesn't go far enough. Meanwhile, in Washington, Senate democrats are calling for a vote on North Carolina native Loretta Lynch's confirmation as attorney general. Both North Carolina senators have pledged to vote against her confirmation. 

The North Carolina General Assembly is back to work in Raleigh and lawmakers are filing dozens of bills.