Labor Union

immigrant works on a field
Russ Allison Loar / Flickr Creative Commons

Advocates for migrant labor in North Carolina fields are gathering outside Gov. Roy Cooper's office to amplify their unhappiness with a bill he signed they say makes it harder to improve worker conditions through union agreements.

a woman and child walking at the Duke University campus.
rmanoske / Flickr, Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/a8PTMJ

Non-tenure faculty at Duke University say they have tentatively agreed to a union contract. The deal would give 14 percent raises to instructors who teach on a course-by-course basis, and 12 percent to faculty on salaries. 

An image of an event from Working American in Greensboro
Carolyn Smith / Working America

Labor Day was established as a national holiday in 1894 to celebrate the achievements of American workers. What does labor in the state and nation look like today?   In 2013, North Carolina had 130,000 workers earning the federal minimum wage of $7.25 or less, comprising 5.8 percent of all hourly-paid workers.

Image of Ramon, who helps out with a Know Your Rights training session.
Ramon Zepeda

Foreign-born farmworkers are vital to the American food system. But while most of the produce that ends up on American plates is handpicked, the day-to-day lives of people laboring in the fields still remains more or less invisible. Ramón Zepeda is a 28-year-old working to change visibility of farmworkers.He grew up in a small farming community in Jalisco, Mexico. Most of his family members have spent time in the fields, and he has devoted his life to working in solidarity with underrepresented workers.