Jobs

A picture of a jar of cash marked 'retirement'.
TaxCredits.net, “Retirement” / Flickr

Baby Boomers have less financial security in retirement than their parents did. That's according to a PNC Financial survey.

The company recently surveyed about 1,200 adults across the country and found that half of retirees are worried about running out of money.

Kathy Kraeblen is a senior wealth advisor for PNC in Raleigh. She said previous generation had a combination of a pension, social security and better savings habits, and they didn't live as long. But, Kraeblin said, Boomers can still learn to budget and re-adjust their investments.

A map showing the hottest growth spots for immigrants in NC
NC Bankers Association

A new study is challenging the notion that low-paid immigrant populations are "taking" jobs from native North Carolinians.

Veteran Job Fair
Leoneda Inge

Hundreds of military veterans from across the Triangle region and beyond packed a special job fair Thursday in Raleigh. 

This job fair at Carter-Finley Stadium was for veterans like Jimmy Hicks of Cameron, near Ft. Bragg.

“Usually I get at least one or two calls back when I attend a job fair," said Hicks.  “Hey, if you get one, I think that’s a good thing."

Hicks retired from the Army in 2000.  He's looking for a career in telecommunications.  His job with Verizon was outsourced some years ago.

A picture of the newspaper want ads
Creative Commons / http://mycareerinfo.ca

The state unemployment rate is dropping, but the labor force is also shrinking. 

The North Carolina Department of Commerce reports unemployment fell from 8.8 percent in January 2013 to 6.7 percent in January 2014.  But that number doesn't include people who have stopped looking for work.  The state's labor force is made up of people who work or are trying to find jobs, and that pool shrank by more than 60,000 people during the year. 

North Carolina State University Economist Michael Walden said 2013 was somewhat of a disappointing year for job growth.

Man holds Unemployment Cliff Poster
Leoneda Inge

North Carolina’s “unemployment cliff” is fast approaching.  That’s what civil rights, religious and other advocacy groups call June 30, the last day tens of thousands of people across the state are eligible for extended benefits from the federal government.  There are last minute efforts underway to try to convince lawmakers to postpone the “cliff” until the end of the year.  But, so far, those efforts have been ignored.

The largest employer in Forsyth County will eliminate 950 jobs by next summer. Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center is bracing for a decrease in medical reimbursements and federal research funding. This week 76 full-time employees will be let go. By June 475 workers will be let go and another 475 positions will be eliminated through attrition and retirement. CEO Dr. John McConnell says no doctors, nurses or P.A.’s will lose their jobs.

BB&T plans to bring 1,700 jobs to Greensboro in the next five years.

Walter Dalton
http://www.ltgov.state.nc.us/

The Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lieutenant Governor Walter Dalton, announced an economic plan today that he says will create more jobs. It includes tax breaks for small businesses and a plan to attract more industries to the state. Capitol Bureau Chief Jessica Jones reports. 

Jessica Jones: Dalton officially unveiled his plan on the patio of a popular brewpub in downtown Raleigh earlier today. A few minutes into his speech, he pulled out a sweet potato and proceeded to explain why he’d brought it along to the press conference.

Across the state elected officials, business leaders and job seekers continue to monitor unemployment rates, local economic growth and job opportunities. In Greensboro the Chamber of Commerce touted some good news this week, hoping to spark a little optimism. Jeff Tiberii reports there are signs of improvement, but also lingering problems in the workforce.

Occasionally, there are headlines about a new company coming to the area and bringing a certain number of jobs with it. Politicians love to talk about job creation, but what does it really mean for a local economy when a handful of people have a shot at employment? How many new jobs would it take to have a truly positive impact on a down economy and does it matter if the jobs are low wage?

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