Jewish Culture

Image of Golden on the campaign trail for Robert F. Kennedy's successful run for US Senate. The inscription reads: "To Harry...and afterwards I put on my coat, did what you told me, and won the election. My thanks, Bob Kennedy"
Harry Golden Papers, J. Murrey Atkins Library Special Collections, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Harry Golden is no longer a household name in North Carolina, but at one point he was likely the most famous North Carolinian in the country. Golden was a Jewish-American writer who grew up in New York City’s Lower East Side in the early 1900s.

As a young classical music producer in the 1980s, Michael Haas was digging through East German archives researching the works of Kurt Weill.

Amy Laura Hall has organized the Labor Sabbath movement in North Carolina.
hearldsun.org

Some North Carolinians cringe at the phrase ‘labor union.’ 

In the right to work state, some opponents say unions cause harm to private businesses and do not benefit workers. This weekend in churches, synagogues and other holy places some clergy will talk about unions as part of a Labor Sabbath movement.  

Jacob Dinezon, Yiddish Writer (black & white picture from the 19th century)
http://www.jacobdinezon.com/

More than 100 years ago, writer Jacob Dinezon was one of the most well-known Yiddish authors. But after his death in 1919, Dinezon was almost forgotten. 

    

In the fall of 1941, German troops killed more than 15,000 Jewish residents in a two-day massacre outside the city of Rovno in Ukraine.

Composer Dan Asia smiling.
danielasia.net

Poet Yehuda Amichai is one of Israel’s most acclaimed artists. His poems explore different aspects of the Jewish faith. American poet Paul Pines also examines the many components of Judaism in his work. American musical composer Dan Asia set both their works to music which will be performed tonight at Elon University

Book cover depicting the bearded Rabbi of Worms
https://wipfandstock.com/store/The_Rabbi_of_Worms

The 11th century isn’t noted in history for its peaceful interfaith relations. And yet, at that time, Christians and Jews alike came from all over Europe to seek the wisdom of the Rabbi of Worms, a French scholar whose commentaries on the scriptures are still used today. Host Frank Stasio talks to writer Marie Hammond about her historical fiction, "The Rabbi of Worms."

Creative Commons

Israel is often seen through the lens of the Israeli-Palestinean conflict, or through the stories of the Holocaust.

Shai Ginsburg wants to change that, to show what life is really like for people in Israel. So he created a film series to showcase true stories from the region.

Rabbi Raachel Jurovics

For years, Raleigh Rabbi Raachel Jurovics cared for a Torah scroll looted by the Nazis from a Czech town she thought had been destroyed. As it turns out, the town is still there, and the residents have restored the synagogue that was the scroll's original home.

Image of Powoll's Grocery from the “Down Home: Jewish Life in North Carolina” exhibit
http://sites.duke.edu/downhome/ / Duke Center for Jewish Studies

  The Jewish Heritage Foundation of North Carolina has been collecting the stories of the state's Jews for years. Now, those recorded interviews are part of an original musical composition - "Down Home: The Cantata."

http://fy.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etty_Hillesum

  Out of the varied horrors of the Holocaust, a body of literature survives.  The most famous voice belongs to Anne Frank.  At 15-years-old, she wrote, “I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart.”  It's hard to believe that anyone, even a child, can be so big-hearted. 

Less well-known is the voice of an adult woman, Etty Hillesum.  And her writing is finally getting its day in the sun.

Rabbi Daniel Greyber
rabbigreyber.com

Rabbi Daniel Greyber has dedicated his life to God, but it is not an unquestioning devotion. Rather, his belief has been shaped by losses that led him to question and consider his faith.

"The Jew Store" (Algonquin Books/1998) is Stella Suberman's bestselling memoir about growing up in a small town in Tennessee where her parents ran the dry goods market. The Great Depression sent Suberman's family back to New York and eventually to Miami where she found a larger community of Jews including her future husband. Her subsequent two books, including her latest, "The GI Bill Boys" (University of Tenneesee Press/2012), chronicle the better part of the 20th century. The Chapel Hill-based author joins host Frank Stasio to talk about her life’s journey.

Jewish-American Identity & Food

Mar 26, 2009

A lot of what we cook defines us. Say "barbecue and sweet tea" and people hear, "the South." The same is true for immigrants. As hyphenated Americans we are what we eat. This will be the subject of an upcoming lecture by Nora Rubel, an assistant professor of religion and classics at the University of Rochester in New York. Rubel earned her graduate degree at UNC-Chapel Hill and returns next week talk about "The Settlement Cookbook and the Transformation of Jewish-American Identity." But first she joins guest host Laura Leslie with a preview.