Jazz

Image of Second Line Stompers
Gregg Gelb

Note: this program is a rebroadcast. 

photo of Lake Street Dive
Danny Clinch

The Brooklyn quartet Lake Street Dive met as students at the New England Conservatory of Music, but the group's musical roots date back decades to the vintage sounds of Motown and The Beatles. The band members channel their jazz training through soul pop arrangements to create a harmonious mix of influences on their latest album, "Side Pony."

Durham trumpeter Al Strong has released his debut solo album, 'LoveStrong Vol. 1.'
Chris Charles / Creative Silence

This is a rebroadcast.

Al Strong started playing music when he was seven years old after his dad got him a drum set for Christmas.

He bounced from the drums to piano, and eventually landed on the trumpet. Throughout high school and college, he studied jazz. Now, he teaches the next generation of trumpeters at N.C. Central University in Durham.

Ellis Dyson and the Shambles

For Ellis Dyson, there is something alluring about the music from the 1920s. He sees it as dirty, raw and mysterious.

With the help of fellow musicians at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dyson has blended the sounds of Dixieland jazz with themes of standard folk ballads to create a "whiskey folk" ensemble.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Dyson about the band's origins and influences as a young group channeling another era.

Alexandrea Lassiter

Mint Julep Jazz Band transports its audience back to jazz clubs of the ‘20s, ‘30s and early ‘40s. The bang gets inspiration and musical creativity from the toe tapping and head nodding of swing dance, something inextricably linked to the jazz of this time period.

Earlier this year, Mint Julep Jazz Band released its second album, “Battle Axe,” an amalgam of original pieces inspired by that era as well as modern arrangements of old songs.

Marcus Anderson, Blending Music And Coffee

Nov 13, 2015
Marcus Anderson combines his passions of music and coffee in his new venture, 'AND Coffee,' an album and coffee line with four flavors.
JAG Entertainment

Marcus Anderson plays the saxophone, and while his work is rooted in jazz, he incorporates other musical influences, especially pop.

For the past three years, Anderson has been working with one of the world’s biggest pop artists: Prince. Anderson plays saxophone in The New Power Generation, the backing band for Prince.

An image of blues musician Albert White
Tim Duffy / Music Maker Relief Foundation

American music can be traced back to the blues, jazz, and many more roots music. The legacy of these roots comes alive this Thursday, June 13, with a roundup of Southern roots musicians from the Music Maker Relief Foundation.

The Epic

Aug 7, 2015
Jazz musician Kamasi Washington
Mike Park

Kamasi Washington has long been known in the world of musical performers, but he is becoming a more popular name in mainstream music in 2015.

He performed on one of the most well-known and well-received hip-hop records this year, Kendrick Lamar's To Pimp A Butterfly. The album increased attention to the intersection of jazz and hip-hop.

An image of jazz musician Kamasi Washington
Mike Park

Kamasi Washington is putting his mark on jazz this year in a big way, venturing outside the world of backup saxophonist to an explorative and evocative bandleader.  

The Be Loud! Sophie Foundation

The Red Clay Ramblers are a decades-old and world-famous string band whose music brings together traditions ranging from old-time mountain music to New Orleans jazz.

Mad Satta is a Neo-Jazz band out of New York City.
madsatta.com

The New York band Mad Satta is part of a new generation of jazz and soul musicians.

The genre is often referred to as neo-jazz, a genre that, perhaps like the origins of jazz, does not have a clear definition. It mixes classic jazz with soul, funk, rock and blues. The eight-member Mad Satta came up with their own definition of neo-jazz, and they are on tour to spread the "cool" at festivals across the country. 

Rap group Toon and the Real Laww performing at Art of Cool
The Art of Cool Poject

 

Jazz and soul fans are welcoming the fourth year of a homegrown tradition: The Art of Cool Fest.

 

 

Friday kicks off a three-day mix of local and national artists bringing the dynamic world of jazz and soul music to Durham.

N.C. musician Ari Picker tries his hand at orchestral composition.
Duke Performances

Ari Picker is best known as the front man for the acclaimed indie rock band Lost in the Trees, but the North Carolina native is now entering orchestral composition.

Inspired by the poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, specifically Book of Hours, Picker has assembled a group of local musicians to debut his piece titled Lion and The Lamb

Drummer Brian Blade Live at INNtöne Jazzfestival 2006.
Thomas Radlwimmer / Wikipedia

Brian Blade is a jazz drummer who has played with artists as diverse as Bob Dylan, saxophone great Wayne Shorter, Joni Mitchell, Emmylou Harris and producer-musician Daniel Lanois.

Since 1997, when he's had time, Brian has been recording with a group called Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band. Their latest album Landmarks was nominated for a Grammy.  

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