International Civil Rights Center & Museum

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

  

The International Civil Rights Center & Museum in Greensboro was built to commemorate a transformative moment in civil rights history when four NC A&T freshmen staged a sit-in at the city's whites-only lunch counter. 

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

City officials announced the resignation of Mujeeb Shah-Khan Friday evening. The announcement comes after a week in which many questions have emerged over a payment the city made to the civil rights museum.

Here's what we know:

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

Members of the Greensboro City Council will get an update Tuesday afternoon about the downtown Civil Rights Museum.  Leaders in Greensboro were upset to learn late last week that part of a loan they approved was paid out before a written agreement went into place.  The city council agree d last fall to provide the Civil Rights Museum with a $1.5 million loan. 

Jack Moebes/Corbis

A Civil Rights pioneer has died. Franklin McCain was one of four teenagers who sat down at an all-white lunch counter in Greensboro on February 1, 1960.

"I certainly wasn't afraid. And I wasn't afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box." - Franklin McCain, interview on NPR

The freshmen from North Carolina A&T ignited a sit-in movement in the Jim Crow south that led to other key chapters in the Civil Rights era.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

The struggling Civil Rights museum in Greensboro will receive a $1.5 million loan from the City. Museum leaders first asked for one and a half million dollars for educational programming earlier this year, than later said they needed the money to keep up with mortgage and loan payments. Members of the city council voted 6-3 Tuesday night and the city will provide half the money in the next 60 days.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

There is a deal on the table to help keep the doors of the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro open.   The museum, at the site of a famous lunch counter sit-in in 1960, has been struggling financially. 

Now, the city's mayor and three council members will bring a potential loan package to the full council.  Museum officials requested $1.5 million.  The city's plan calls for a total of $750,000 and creates committees to help oversee operations.  

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

The Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro has formally asked city leaders for $1.5 million in funding.

Since the museum opened in 2010, it has run an annual deficit and failed to meet attendance goals. Museum leaders floated the idea of asking the city to help fund educational programs.

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum faces ongoing financial struggles, and the Greensboro mayor wants the city to take it over.
Jeff Tiberii

The International Civil Rights Center and Museum opened in Greensboro nearly three and a half years ago.  A national sit-in movement began on February 1st, 1960 at an F.W. Woolworth lunch counter on Elm Street, and today that site remains a commemoration and celebration of a chapter in American history.