India

Indian architects High Point
Smita Prakash / Space Design Collective Home

The inside of April's High Point Furniture Market was a dizzying scene of designers, buyers and manufacturers all perusing the latest in the furniture industry.

For the first time, a delegation of architects and interior designers from India made the trip to High Point.

Balabhadra (left), Subhadra (center) and Lord Jagannath (right) on display at a temple in Bhubenswar, India.
Krupasindhu Muduli / Wikipedia

Pilgrims flocked to the Hindu temple in Morrisville this weekend to celebrate the installation of three new deities there.

Trilok Pillai of the Hindu Society of North Carolina says about 1,000 people came to honor Lord Jagannath, who is considered by some Hindus to be a form of the protector god Vishnu. Jagannath  was installed with his brother and sister deities, Balahadra and Subhadra.

Pillai says the temple was already well attended, but he expects the new installations will draw more faithful.

A U.S. Army Air Forces plane flies over 'The Hump' in the Himalayan Mountains in 1945. Many U.S. planes crashed in this area during World War II due to the terrain.
United States Army Air Forces / Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of U.S. aircrafts were lost during World War II along a remote military supply route in the Himalayas called the Hump. The treacherous terrain caused hundreds of World War II service members to crash, scattering their remains along the region.

For decades, families have waited for the lost veterans' remains to return to the U.S., but a border dispute between India and China has stalled military search efforts from recovering the remains.

Peter Janse of the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, examines one of the engine of the B-24 Hot as Hell in Arunachal Pradesh, India in 2008.
JPAC/Jesse M. Shipps

A U.S. recovery team has returned to a remote part of India to try to retrieve the remains of troops killed in World War II. Family members say a border dispute between India and China has delayed recovery efforts for years.


Girl in the Road book cover
crownpublishing.com

Author Monica Byrne was reading a poem that included the words "ocean" and "bridge," when something just clicked. She couldn't get the idea out of her head: a pedestrian bridge so long it spanned the Arabian Sea. The vision formed the basis of her debut novel, "The Girl in the Road" (Crown Publishing/2014), which is set decades in the future.

The novel combines months of research and travel with numerous autobiographical details. It considers the different ways people recover from trauma.

Learn more about Monica and her work here.

In 1989, Safdar Hashmi was an activist, artist and communist performing a protest play Halla Bol! or "Raise Your Voice!" outside municipal polling places near Delhi, India.