Immigration

Gov. Pat McCrory
Governor's Office

  Governor Pat McCrory says state officials don't have enough information about what he calls unaccompanied children. He says at least 1,200 children have crossed the US border since January and are now placed with sponsors in the state.

State officials are publicly calling on the federal government to help address the issue. McCrory says they don't have details, including how old the children are, where they're staying or if they're safe.

The recent increase in the number of unaccompanied, undocumented minors immigrating across the border has left tens of thousands of children waiting in limbo. But thousands of children who are already American citizens also face an uncertain future — because their parents are not in the country legally.

If their parents get deported, those minors could end up in foster care, or adopted by strangers.

Paul Cuadros (pictured third from the left) and his team, Los Jets
Nuvo TV

  UNC journalism professor Paul Cuadros came to North Carolina 15 years ago to write about Latino migration.

A few years into his research, he launched Los Jets, the varsity soccer team at Jordan-Matthews High School in Siler City. It was wildly successful, but some of his players face an uncertain future when they leave the pitch. They are all sons of Latino immigrants, some of whom came to this country illegally.

Cuadros wrote a book about his team in 2006, called “Home on the Field: How One Championship Team Inspires Hope for the Revival of a Small Town.”

Photo: A mock graduation for undocumented immigrants behind the Legislative Building in downtown Raleigh
Jorge Valencia

Five students walked 140 miles from Charlotte to Raleigh over the last 10 days to ask state lawmakers for in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants.

Elver Barrios, a computer engineering student at Johnson C. Smith University, and one of the advocates, says that when the group left last week, momentum seemed on their side.

"We were really excited on the first day of walking," he says.

But walking 15 miles a day means blisters on the feet and lots of sun on the face. It turns out there’s not much shade between Charlotte and Raleigh.

A map showing the hottest growth spots for immigrants in NC
NC Bankers Association

A new study is challenging the notion that low-paid immigrant populations are "taking" jobs from native North Carolinians.

Cedars in the Pines is a new exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of History.
www.ncdcr.gov / North Carolina Museum of History

 

 Food, music and dancing are just a few of the contributions of Lebanese Americans to North Carolina’s culture. "Cedars in the Pines,” a new exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of History, showcases the influence of Lebanese immigrants on the state.

David Benbennick via wikimedia commons

North Carolina civil rights groups are urging the U.S. Justice Department to launch a federal investigation into two North Carolina school districts that allegedly discriminated against immigrant youth.

The complaint says that Buncombe and Union county schools unlawfully complicated and denied enrollment  to two 17-year-olds, which coalition attorneys say represents a much larger problem in the state.

Emilio Vicente
Emilio Vicente campaign

Late last week The Daily Tar Heel, UNC-Chapel Hill's student newspaper, wrote an article titled "5 Students Enter Race For SBP." (SBP is student body president.)

"As of Tuesday night, five students are in the running for UNC Student Body President.

Jennifer Ho, English professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
englishcomplit.unc.edu / UNC-Chapel Hill

When Jennifer Ho went to the hospital for testing on a lump in her breast, she encountered the image often associated with breast cancer: the pink ribbon.

A nurse led the UNC English professor to an exam room. She recalls, "And then I saw a tote bag with UNC hospital's name on it and the pink ribbon. And I had this immediate visceral reaction. And I'm walking with the nurse. And I said something I can't repeat on the air." Ho said, "I hate those *** pink ribbons."

Wikimedia Commons

  

Today is transgender day of remembrance, a day designated to remembering transgender people who have lost their lives to violence this past year.

Anil Gandhi
Jessica Jones

When South Asian immigrants to this country get homesick, there’s a good chance they can probably locate an Indian restaurant or grocery store to remind them of home. Finding a place that stocks the plants and trees they grew up with is much harder.

Branford Marsalis, Arlie Petters, and Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abenyi join the State of Things for the roundtable conversation.
Laura Lee

On this week’s roundtable, a jazz great, a leading string theory mathematician and an accomplished writer share their diverse perspectives on the latest headlines. They’ll discuss a range of issues from the latest Middle East update to the challenges facing minorities in higher education. 

Sign at the U.S. Border
Makaristos via Creative Commons

Last year, Immigration and Customs Enforcement deported more than 400,000 people. But what happens when those deportees are parents? Children may end up in foster care as parents abroad struggle to regain custody. 

NC Legislative Building
Dave DeWitt

This week, the General Assembly overrode two of Governor McCrory’s vetoes on high profile measures. One measure requires drug testing for certain welfare recipients and the other loosens restrictions for seasonal workers. Host Frank Stasio speaks with WUNC's Capitol bureau chief Jessica Jones about the response to legislature's moves. In other political news, the State Board of Elections ruled yesterday on two controversial decisions by local elections boards. Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC’s Raleigh bureau chief Dave DeWitt about the decisions. 

North Carolina legislative building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Lawmakers will be back in session Tuesday to consider overriding Governor McCrory's vetoes of two bills.

Kay Hagan is urging the US Attorney General to review NC's Voter ID law.
Third Way Think Tank via Flickr, Creative Commons

U.S. Senator Kay Hagan says she's asked the nation's Attorney General to look into the state's new Voter ID law.  The North Carolina Democrat says she wanted Eric Holder to examine the legislation signed this month by Republican Governor Pat McCrory.  Hagan says the law enacts restrictions that could suppress voter turnout among minorities, as well as younger and older voters.  Supporters say it's intended to prevent fraud at the polls.  Hagan told WUNC's Frank Stasio those instances barely exist.

A supporter of the Dream Act petitioned for its passage last August.
OneAmerica via Flickr, creative commons

Last summer, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security rolled out a plan to allow undocumented young people who meet certain requirements to receive a temporary legal reprieve. More than 17,000 people in North Carolina have applied for status under the measure, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA.

Gov. Pat McCrory
NC Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory vetoed two bills today.

One (HB 786) known as the "Reclaiming NC Act" would have required undocumented immigrants to submit to criminal background checks and fingerprinting to obtain driving permits. It also would have allowed police to detain people they suspect of being undocumented for up to 24 hours. It was heavily critiqued by NC's ACLU chapter and others. McCrory said in a statement that he vetoed it due to a loophole that would allow businesses to hire more undocumented workers.

The second bill Gov. McCrory vetoed today (HB 392) would have required drug testing for Work First applicants, a state program that provides financial assistance and job training to needy families.  The ACLU of North Carolina and the N.C. Justice Center had publicly discouraged Gov. McCrory from signing the bill, saying that it would violate the privacy of low-income people.

U.S. House of Representatives

Some North Carolina members of the U.S. House are taking sides as their chamber gets ready to take up immigration reform this week.   Many House Republicans on Capitol Hill disagree with the comprehensive reform plan passed by the Senate.


GOP Congressman George Holding of Raleigh says the bill doesn't go far enough to protect the border today.  He also says he doesn't think it will be effective moving forward.

Kay Hagan
hagan.senate.gov

U.S. Senator Kay Hagan was among the supporters helping to pass an immigration reform plan proposed by a bipartisan group of her colleagues.  The Senate voted 68-32 in favor of the bill introduced by the Senate's so-called 'Gang of Eight' as a way to provide a path to citizenship for more than 11 million people who entered the country illegally. 

Hagan says she spoke with many North Carolinians who urged her to support the bill and said it will benefit the nation on several fronts.

New DACA drivr's license
NCDOT

The North Carolina Department of Transportation has made an about face and is abandoning its controversial decision to add a bold pink stripe across the top of new driver licenses for young immigrants.  A news release issued Thursday afternoon by the state DOT confirms that the Division of Motor Vehicles will begin issuing driver licenses on Monday, March 25, 2013 for immigrants qualifying under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.  But the attached ‘final’ image of the driver license no longer has the pink stripe or the words ‘No Lawful Status’ printed in large type.

North Carolina legislative building
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Educators don’t often get a chance to celebrate publicly, so it was understandable when State Superintendent June Atkinson stood up at a news conference last fall and bragged a little about North Carolina’s 80 percent high school graduation rate.

“This is excellent news for our state and one more step toward ensuring that all of our students graduate from high school career, college, and citizenship ready,” said Atkinson.

Strickland Farms tobacco and house
Leoneda Inge

A new survey shows farmers across North Carolina are worried about the agricultural workforce shortage.  And they want Immigration Reform to help fix it.  More than 600 farmers filled out the Agricultural Workforce survey spear-headed by the North Carolina Farm Bureau.  Faylene Whitaker of Whitaker Farms in Climax, NC, filled one out.

North Carolina driver's license
NCDOT

State DOT officials will issue redesigned driver's licenses later this year that will visually distinguish citizens from non-citizens.   Immigrants here under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program will notice their licenses will have the words "No Lawful Status" printed on them.  State DOT spokeswoman Greer Beaty says those words will be in a bar across the top that will differ from the blue on a normal license.

North Carolina Senator Kay Hagan
www.hagan.senate.gov

Senators from both sides of the political aisle have come to a compromise on federal immigration reform.  North Carolina Senator Kay Hagan is welcoming an immigration proposal from a group of eight of her colleagues. Their proposal seeks to revamp the system that allows immigrants into the country as well as create a citizenship pathway for the millions of immigrants currently in the country illegally. 

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