A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrest.
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Thousands of women and children from Central America are still waiting for decisions about whether they will be granted asylum in the United States. Many came here to escape rising violence in their home countries.

But until their court dates, they are being held at family detention centers along the Southwest border. Advocates and attorneys have reported prison-like conditions at these facilities with limited access to legal representation.

Federal officials say they're willing to hand over details about a proposed immigration detention facility to towns in Wake County provided that local officials keep them a secret. But the request from the General Services Administration could be subject to North Carolina's public records law. Lana Hygh is Cary's liaison to the GSA. She says town officials are trying to determine whether the confidentiality request is allowed under state law.

The proposed move of a federal Immigrations and Customs Enforcement office in Cary is raising hackles among some residents. ICE officials want to move from a Cary business park to another location. One of the sites being considered is in a shopping center where a supermarket was housed. Susan Moran is a spokesperson for the town of Cary.

Susan Moran: "If the ICE facility were to relocate there and be more than 12 thousand square feet, and that building is 59 thousand square feet, it would absolutely violate the zoning conditions for that area."