HIV/AIDS

Trinn Suwannapha

Today is World AIDS Day and the North Carolina AIDS Action Network is encouraging people who are at risk of HIV or who are HIV positive to enroll in health insurance during open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act. 

Image of Lisa Hightown-Weidman and her family
Courtesy of Lisa Hightow-Weidman

Lisa Hightow-Weidman grew up with her nose always in a book. She majored in English in college and had aspirations of becoming a writer.

A bunch of red balloons.
LeAnn E. Crowe / Flickr

It's World AIDS Day, a time when health educators work to raise awareness about the threat of HIV/AIDS. The state Department of Health and Human Services estimates that more than 36,000 North Carolinians are living with HIV

Stethoscope
jasleen_kaur / Flickr Creative Commons

Scientists have set their sights on finding a cure for AIDS. At the opening of the International AIDS Society conference in Vancouver, AIDS researchers made a call to action for a worldwide shift in HIV treatment.

They now suggest that doctors provide medication immediately after a diagnosis instead of first waiting for the signs of illness to appear.

A picture of the UNC and GSK press conference.
WUNC

UNC-Chapel Hill announced a partnership this week with pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline to work on a cure for AIDS.

Scientists say what once was a lofty goal is now more realistic, thanks in part to UNC's already-extensive AIDS research. 

GSK and UNC will create a company called Qura Therapeutics to oversee more research at UNC laboratories, with an eye on producing a cure within the next 30 years.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Triangle Business Journal reporter Jason deBruyn about the details of the partnership.

A picture of the UNC and GSK press conference.
WUNC

UNC-Chapel Hill has teamed up with pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline to find a cure for HIV/AIDS.

Chancellor Carol Folt announced the creation of Qura Therapeutics, which will oversee the new HIV Cure center. The center will bring together researchers from UNC and GSK.

GSK will contribute $20 million for the first five years.

GSK CEO Andrew Witty says research on the virus has come a long way since the 1980s, when a cure for AIDS was thought to be impossible.

Image of Veteran AIDS Activist Sean Strub
Sean Strub

  

Sean Strub is best known as the founder of POZ magazine and the first openly HIV-positive person to run for Congress.