State of North Carolina

Late last week it was announced that several NC buildings had been added to the National Register of Historic Places. We've highlighted eight of those buildings here.

It's no surprise that the  gorgeous Flat Top Estate was added to the list. But some of the other additions may surprise you. They give a nod to beach-style architecture, to our textile history, and to integration.

Not The End, But The Beginning Book Cover

Brian McDonald taught at Jordan High School for 13 years before he became interested in the history of the school. And when he looked, he found a school that grew up along with the Civil Rights Movement. His new book; “Not the End, but the Beginning: The Impact of Race and Class on the History of Jordan High School” (NCCU/2011), explores the history of the high school. 

The Neuse is Scuttled - March 1865
Stephen McCall / CSS Neuse State Historic Site

This week, an archaeological team is expected to set out to see if they can find remains of the CSS Neuse, a battleship that met a watery grave near Kinston, NC, during the Civil War. Now, many of you history buffs might know why parts of an ironclad ship is lying inland, at the bottom of the Neuse River, but we did not. The story is at times dramatic, frustrating and incredibly sad.

NC's first female judge, Mamie Dowd Walker
Milo Pyne

Judge Mamie Dowd Walker was a widow with two children when she was appointed the first female judge in North Carolina in 1934.  It was a first for North Carolina not only because Judge Walker was female, but also because she had no legal training.  But her grandson Milo Pyne says his grandmother "needed the money." 

Cedars in the Pines is a new exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of History.
www.ncdcr.gov / North Carolina Museum of History


 Food, music and dancing are just a few of the contributions of Lebanese Americans to North Carolina’s culture. "Cedars in the Pines,” a new exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of History, showcases the influence of Lebanese immigrants on the state.

Apostles of Reason by Molly Worthen
http://global.oup.com/ / Oxford University Press


Evangelical Christians are a diverse group with similar questions but vastly different answers. 

Book cover depicting the bearded Rabbi of Worms

The 11th century isn’t noted in history for its peaceful interfaith relations. And yet, at that time, Christians and Jews alike came from all over Europe to seek the wisdom of the Rabbi of Worms, a French scholar whose commentaries on the scriptures are still used today. Host Frank Stasio talks to writer Marie Hammond about her historical fiction, "The Rabbi of Worms."

Wesley Hogan
Christopher Sims, via CDSPorch.com

Wesley Hogan's interest in storytelling stretches back to her childhood. 

The Clothesline Muse is a new multi-discipline theater project.
The Clothesline Muse


In the past, the clothesline was a place where a community’s women met to hang laundry. 

For hundreds of years, this nation has been known as the United States of America. But according to author and journalist Colin Woodard, the country is neither united, nor made up of 50 states. Woodward has studied American voting patterns, demographics and public opinion polls going back to the days of the first settlers, and says that his research shows America is really made up of 11 different nations.