Apostles of Reason by Molly Worthen
http://global.oup.com/ / Oxford University Press


Evangelical Christians are a diverse group with similar questions but vastly different answers. 

Book cover depicting the bearded Rabbi of Worms

The 11th century isn’t noted in history for its peaceful interfaith relations. And yet, at that time, Christians and Jews alike came from all over Europe to seek the wisdom of the Rabbi of Worms, a French scholar whose commentaries on the scriptures are still used today. Host Frank Stasio talks to writer Marie Hammond about her historical fiction, "The Rabbi of Worms."

Wesley Hogan
Christopher Sims, via CDSPorch.com

Wesley Hogan's interest in storytelling stretches back to her childhood. 

The Clothesline Muse is a new multi-discipline theater project.
The Clothesline Muse


In the past, the clothesline was a place where a community’s women met to hang laundry. 

For hundreds of years, this nation has been known as the United States of America. But according to author and journalist Colin Woodard, the country is neither united, nor made up of 50 states. Woodward has studied American voting patterns, demographics and public opinion polls going back to the days of the first settlers, and says that his research shows America is really made up of 11 different nations.

America's Music is a film and performance series at the North Regional Branch of Wake County Libraries.

America’s Music is a film and performance series that traces the soundtrack of a nation. The program features documentary screenings and discussions about the history of 20th century American popular music from blues to Broadway and bluegrass to rock 'n' roll. 

The succession of North Carolina Governors poster.
NC Bankers Association

Curious to know what all the North Carolina governors looked like? Now you can see all 68 (well, most of them) in one place, thanks to the North Carolina Bankers Association. They’ve reissued their poster of the state’s gubernatorial lineage, which hadn’t been updated in more than 50 years.  

Cover of the book 'Sounds of War: Music in the United States during World War II'.
Philip E Pascuzzo/National Archives / Oxford University Press


World War II was fought not only with guns and bombs but also with strings, brass, and percussion.

The American government used classical music as part of the war effort to demonstrate the cultural dominance of the Allies. The military also used songs to rally American troops.

An underground railroad marker in Ohio.
HystericalMark via Flickr, Creative Commons

A little known part of Civil War history will be honored today on the Outer Banks.  A marker will honor a group of slaves who fled to the area in August, 1861 on their way north to freedom.  About 100 slaves helped Union troops load ships and build fortifications after the capture of forts Hatteras and Clark in return for food and shelter. 

The remains of Fort San Juan.
Robin Beck

A group of archeologists has discovered the remains of the oldest known European settlement in the inland U.S.: a 16th century Spanish fort in western North Carolina. 

Fort San Juan was the largest of six forts built between 1566 and 1568 by explorer Juan Pardo. It’s located five miles north of Morganton at a site that was believed to be an Indian settlement. 

Robin Beck is an assistant professor of archeology at the University of Michigan and was part of the discovery team.  He says the site has something in common with North Carolina's more famous early settlement.